H2 Math Tuition 2020

H2 Math can prove to be quite challenging for many students. Historically, the distinction rate is 50%, meaning that half of the student population will get an ‘A’ grade.

However, note that those 50% can be heavily represented by the top schools RI, HCI, NJC where almost all students get ‘A’. At the end of the day, the ‘A’ level students are facing heavy competition from the IP cohort (who were absent from the O levels).

Tough topics in ‘A’ level H2 Math:

Case study: I tutored a student (from China) studying in NJC for H2 Math. Although she was quite a strong student with good Math foundation (definitely above average), nevertheless the NJC H2 Math paper was set so tough that she only scored 50+ out of 100 in the prelims. Many students in her NJC class outright failed for the prelims (below 50 marks). There were some weaknesses in her H2 Math skills, for example certain topics like Integration and P&C, and also carelessness issues. After several months of tutoring, noticeable improvements were observed. In the end for the actual ‘A’ levels, she managed to score A grade for H2 Math.

Read more on student testimonials here: Testimonials


For H2 Math tuition, contact our experienced tutor Mr Wu at:

Email: mathtuition88@gmail.com

Phone:

IP Math Tuition (Integrated Programme)

IP, or Integrated Programme, is well known to test more advanced mathematics than ‘O’ level.

For example:

  • For partial fractions, IP schools like to test improper fractions. Most of the time, ‘O’ level schools test the easier version of proper fractions.
  • IP schools like to test half-angle formula in trigonometry. This will absolutely stun students who have not encountered or learnt it before, since teachers rarely teach it in school.
  • IP schools like to test “area to the left of the curve“, or the dy version of the usual “area under the curve”. Again, this is something that is quite tricky and not usually tested in ‘O’ levels.

Even though IP students do not have ‘O’ levels, they still have to maintain a grade of around 60% (depending on school) in order to promote successfully and avoid the scenario of being transferred to the ‘O’ level track.

One problem in IP schools is that the teachers like to teach a very strange and impractical version of the syllabus. For example, they often teach stuff that are not tested, whilst things that are tested are often not taught. This leads to weaker students being totally lost in class. Also, there are many fancy extracurricular programs in IP schools that further distract the student from the actual important tests.

Hence, many students (even those who score above 250 in PSLE) cannot cope well with the IP syllabus, due to the above factors.


For IP Math Tuition (Upper secondary), contact our tutor Mr Wu at:

Email: mathtuition88@gmail.com

Phone:

Online Math Tuition Singapore

We provide online Math Tuition using Zoom, Skype or Google Hangouts for the following subjects:

  • E Maths (Sec 3 & Sec 4)
  • A Maths (Sec 3 & Sec 4)
  • H2 Maths
  • H3 Maths
  • University Maths (selected modules)
  • Olympiad Math

Do contact our tutor Mr Wu at:

Email: mathtuition88@gmail.com

Phone (WhatsApp/SMS preferred):

Face-to-face home tuition is also available at West region of Singapore (near Jurong East/ Clementi/ Bukit Batok).

No Exams Singapore

The latest policy update is that there will be reduced or no exams for certain levels such as lower primary and lower secondary.

Do check out our Poll writeup for more details: Poll: Opinion on Fewer exams for Primary and Lower Secondary Students?

It seems that it is quite a dilemma; parents find exams stressful, yet exams are viewed as necessary by most parents to measure how their child is learning. According to Today Online, tuition centres have great success offering their own “in-house exams” to fill in the gap. At the end of the day, the “big exams” like PSLE, O-Levels, A-Levels are still present, and that is the major feature in the education landscape.

It is quite like “lump sum payment” (single exam at end of the year) versus “payment by installments” (multiple exams throughout the year). In the end, the full sum still has to be paid (students still have to study the material to pass the final exam).

No homework, full-day school curriculum to help level playing field (Proposal, not implemented yet)

Full-day school is quite a drastic measure to combat tuition. Also, unless full-day means 7am to 7pm, it is unlikely to be different from the status quo.

Any parent with children in secondary school or JC is aware that school is already pretty much “full-day” as of today, from 7am to 5pm at the minimum on most days (including CCA). Hence, there is not much room to get more “full-day” than now. JC students are known to stay much later for CCA, probably some are already having schedules from 7am to 7pm, which more than qualifies as “full-day”.

Also, even if full-day school (say 7am to 7pm) is implemented, there seems nothing to stop students from having tuition during the weekends, or on weekdays 8pm-10pm.

Probably most students would not be too pleased at having a full-day school. If I were still a student, I would definitely be more stressed out by the full-day school. I would much rather have some homework but end school early. I would imagine teachers won’t be too happy too, full-day school for students means full-day school for teachers, since obviously some if not all teachers must stay back to supervise the students.

Most unhappy would be tutors, for obvious reasons. Probably if this is implemented, most tutors will have to change jobs. 😛

The underlying idea to level the playing field is good and makes sense though. Possibly make the full-day optional so that those who want to stay back and have the full-day can do so, those who want to leave can also do so.

Source: TodayOnline

SINGAPORE — To level the playing field for children from less advantaged socio-economic backgrounds, and break out of the country’s tuition culture, Nominated Member of Parliament Chia Yong Yong has suggested that all schools adopt a full-day curriculum.

That way, the children will complete their homework during school hours, and be able to spend more time on “push-frontier practicals” aimed at training them to become more comfortable in tackling problems and to grow an appetite for risk-taking. These qualities are essential traits for the current technological revolution, also known as Industry 4.0, she said.

In her Budget debate speech in Parliament on Wednesday (Feb 28), Ms Chia said the current academic model “runs the risk of not harnessing the potential of all our young people” who do not have access to enrichment and tuition classes. As a result, those from more advantaged socio-economic backgrounds who have access to these classes will outperform their peers.

Stressing that “every school is a good school, but not every home is equal”, the lawyer said the current system has been “abused” such that inequality continues to be perpetuated and deepened.

5 Skills Students Need To Cope With School Pressures

According to an article published by the American Psychological Association (APA), many teenagers in the USA say they experience stress in patterns comparable to what adults go through. Teenagers also report higher stress levels than adults during the school year.

Tutors from Leaps ‘n Bounds, a learning center in Dubai, also observe that teen stress is not just confined to adolescents in certain countries; it is slowly becoming a widespread issue.

Teen stress can be caused by different factors including the pressure to perform well (or at least to pass) academically and in sports, and to have a great social life. In school, adolescents constantly face tough academic demands and responsibilities and experience social pressure.

Unfortunately, these challenges spill over even after the afternoon school bell rings, which can cause teenagers to feel even more stressed.

Dealing with Teen Stress

For teenagers to learn how to effectively deal with school pressures, they need to develop and rely on key personal skills. These include:

1.    Time management

All teenagers today always seem to be swamped with numerous activities: assignments, studying, extracurricular activities and sports. They need to find time for their friends, too.

Because teenagers need to have enough time to go through and complete these activities, they need to learn how to manage their time properly. Time management is an important skill they need to develop. This skill pertains to their ability to plan and control how they spend the hours in their day to complete their tasks and accomplish their goals.

 With proper time management, teens will be able to establish which tasks to prioritize and how to set their goals, and learn how to monitor where their time actually goes. As such, they will be able to avoid the stress of not having enough time on their hands to finish their assignments, complete their projects, meet their friends, and see their maths tutors in Dubai, if they have additional weekly tutorial or learning sessions.

2.    Setting realistic goals

Being number one in the class and, at the same time, for example, being the captain of the school football team are goals worth working hard for. However, overachieving teens tend to feel more pressure. When they fail or feel they didn’t perform up to expectations, they may develop low self-esteem and other negative feelings and attitudes.

Teenagers, therefore, are encouraged to lower their goals or set more realistic ones so that they can achieve more. By doing so, teens will also avoid pressure and boost academic success.

3.    Positive coping skills

 Coping skills are daily strategies and activities everyone uses or relies on to deal with, work through, or process emotions. Examples of positive coping skills include exercising, meditating, talking with friends or other family members, and having healthy hobbies such as reading and gardening.

Teenagers need to develop and practice positive coping skills instead of negative ones so that they will learn how to deal with stress through healthy ways. Positive coping strategies increase long-term resilience and well-being.

Negative coping techniques such as smoking and using drugs, on the other hand, may provide temporary relief from difficult emotions and pressure but lead to substance dependency and abuse.

For teenagers to effectively withstand adversity and deal confidently with daily stress and other challenges, they need to choose and apply positive coping strategies.

4.    Self-care

 For teens to better cope with pressure, they also need to have strong, healthy bodies. Teenagers, therefore, need to get enough sleep and rest, have a well-balanced diet, and get the right amount of exercise their bodies they need every day.

Adolescents need to take some time to pause from the relentless pace of everyday life and enjoy some creative activities that will help keep them from dwelling on or stressing over school pressures. This, in turn, will help them lower their stress levels.

5.    Optimism

Generally, stress is precipitated by stressful thinking. As such, teens can avoid stress and its negative effects by changing the way they think. When they have a positive mental attitude, they will have stronger coping strategies, better health, and a more stable, less stressful emotional life.

Adopting a positive way of thinking also helps teens complete their work and handle all their responsibilities. If they consistently think they won’t finish something or they don’t have enough time on their hands, they will lack the motivation to complete what they already started or even begin their task.

Teenagers only have a few more years before they enter another important phase in their lives: adulthood. But they can still enjoy all the experiences that come with adolescence and, at the same time, cope with all their school work and other activities without all the stress by simply developing the right skills.

AUTHOR BIO

Bushra Manna is one of the founders and Principal of Leaps and Bounds Education Centre – Motorcity. She has 20 years’ experience teaching the British and American curricula internationally at primary level – early middle school level, ages 4-12. Bushra believes in imparting deep learning to a child and not just rote learning, which is why she recommends the Magikats programme at her centre, to promote a genuine understanding with its multisensory, differentiated and interactive approach within a small group setting.

 

 

5 Math Tips That Will Speed Up Your Calculations

5 Math Tips That Will Speed Up Your Calculations

For most students, regardless of their age, studying math seems like a nightmare. Taking tuition for maths helps when you or your child struggle with calculations.

Check out these 5 simple tricks for making mental math faster and more accurate:

  1. 11 Times Trick – It’s easy to multiply single digit numbers with 11: just repeat the number, but what about double digits? This trick is almost shockingly simple: just add a space between the two digits, and insert their sum in the middle. E.g., 32 x 11 = 3(3+2)2, or 352.

If the total is more than 9, add 1 to the first digit and insert the second number, e.g. 78 x 11 = 7(7+8)8, or 7(15)8. Move the 1, so 7+1(5)8 = 858.

  1. Large Sums Trick – To add large numbers quickly in your head, convert them into multiples of 10. E.g. 762 + 816 can be rounded off to 760 + 820, so 1580. Add up the remaining numbers taken aside while rounding off the two, i.e. +2 and -4, so -2. Then add these to the previous total, so 1580 – 2 = 1578.
  2. Binary & Bisect Trick – To multiply two numbers, one of which is even, here’s what to do. Divide the even number by 2 and multiply the other by two, and continue doing this till you reach numbers that are easy to calculate. E.g. 12 x 37 = 6 x 74 = 3 x 148 = 444, and 20 x 43 = 10 x 86 = 860.
  3. Multiplication Trick – To multiply numbers quickly, follow these rules:
  • Multiplying by 4: Multiply by 2 and then again by 2, e.g. 42 x 4 = 84 x 2 = 168.
  • Multiplying by 5: Multiply by 10 and then divide by 2, e.g. 190 x 5 = 1900/2 = 950.
  • Multiplying by 9: Multiply by 10 and then subtract the original number from the result, e.g. 26 x 9 = 260 – 26 = 234
  • Multiplying by 99: Multiply by 100 and then subtract the original number from the result, e.g. 51 x 99 = 5100 – 51 = 5049.
  1. Percentages Trick – “Percent” literally means per 100, so break down a number into 100s to find a certain percentage. E.g. 8% of 400 = 8 per 4 hundreds, so 8 x 4 = 32. If the number is under 100, move the decimal point. E.g. 8% of 50 = 8 x 5 or 40, and with the decimal point moved, 4.

What about 8% of 350? Add up the 8s for each 100, and half of an 8 for the remaining 50, so (8 x 3) + 4 = 28. The same for 8 x 35, but moving the decimal point, so 2.8. Percentages can also be flipped, so 32% of 5 is the same as 5% of 32.

Math doesn’t have to be scary, and an online math tutor can help you deal with advanced problems without getting overwhelmed.

About Author: Making education simple and easy to comprehend is Dana Jandhayala’s forte. She’s had a long career as an educator where she has taught in several different schools and institutes in multiple countries. Today, she helps students with personalized online tutorials by SchoolPage that help make concepts easy to understand, making learning fast and fun. She writes to help students study better, and to coach parents so they can facilitate the success of their children.

 

Jurong East Maths Tuition

Maths Tuition

Tutor (Mr Wu):
– Raffles Alumni
– NUS 1st Class Honours in Mathematics

Experience: More than 10 years experience, has taught students from RJC, NJC, ACJC and many other JCs. Also has experience teaching Additional Math (O Level, IP).

Personality: Friendly, patient and good at explaining complicated concepts in a simple manner. Provides tips for how to check for careless mistakes, and tackle challenging problems.

Email: mathtuition88@gmail.com

Areas teaching (West / Central Singapore, including Bukit Batok, Dover, Clementi, Jurong)

Bukit Batok Maths Tuition

Maths Tuition

Tutor (Mr Wu):
– Raffles Alumni
– NUS 1st Class Honours in Mathematics

Experience: More than 10 years experience, has taught students from RJC, NJC, ACJC and many other JCs. Also has experience teaching Additional Math (O Level, IP).

Personality: Friendly, patient and good at explaining complicated concepts in a simple manner. Provides tips for how to check for careless mistakes, and tackle challenging problems.

Email: mathtuition88@gmail.com

Areas teaching (West / Central Singapore, including Bukit Batok, Dover, Clementi, Jurong)

Looking for Home Tutors?

If you are looking for home tutors (any subject, e.g. Mathematics, Chinese, English, Science, etc.) contact us at:

Email: mathtuition88@gmail.com

We are able to recommend you highly qualified tutors, free of charge, no obligations.

Note that usually tutors’ slots will start to fill up as the year progresses, so by mid year May/June it is going to be very hard to find a good tutor.

Secondary Chinese Tuition (IP / O Level)

Ms Gao specializes in tutoring Secondary Level Chinese. Can teach composition, comprehension, etc, according to student’s weaknesses.

Has taught students from RI (IP Programme), MGS, and more. Familiar with IP and O Level (HCL/CL) Chinese syllabus.

Website: https://chinesetuition88.com/

Email: chinesetuition88@gmail.com

Secondary Level Chinese Tuition

Looking for O Level / IP / JC Chinese Tuition?

Ms Gao specializes in teaching secondary level chinese (CL/HCL) tuition in Singapore. Ms Gao has taught students from various schools, including RI (Raffles Institution IP Programme).

Teaches West / Central Area: E.g. Clementi, Jurong East, Bukit Timah, Dover, Bishan, Marymount

Email: chinesetuition88@gmail.com
Website: http://chinesetuition88.com

H2 Maths Tuition by Ex-RI, NUS 1st Class Honours (Mathematics)

Junior College H2 Maths Tuition

About Tutor (Mr Wu): https://mathtuition88.com/singapore-math-tutor/
– Raffles Alumni
– NUS 1st Class Honours in Mathematics

Experience: More than 10 years experience, has taught students from RJC, NJC, ACJC and many other JCs.

Personality: Friendly, patient and good at explaining complicated concepts in a simple manner

Email: mathtuition88@gmail.com

Areas teaching (West / Central Singapore):

  • Clementi
  • Jurong East
  • Buona Vista
  • West Coast
  • Dover
  • Central Areas like Bishan/Toa Payoh/Marymount (near MRT)

Kids with tuition fare worse?

Article: http://www.straitstimes.com/opinion/kids-with-tuition-fare-worse

Those who read the news, either online or in print, would probably have seen this article: “Kids with tuition fare worse”.

In the article, it is claimed that: “In fact, children who received tuition actually scored about 0.256 standard deviations lower on their tests than those who did not (standard deviation is a measure of how spread out test scores are from the average).”

The headline is actually quite misleading, causing people to think that tuition causes worse performance. One needs to read the final part of the article: “The first is that students who receive tuition choose to receive it precisely because they are not doing well in school. In other words, weak performance may be what is driving students to enrol for tuition.”

The correct way to measure the effect of tuition is via a “before and after” experiment. Scores of students before and after enrolling in tuition should be compared to truly see if tuition has any effect. Many tuition centers are already doing this, it is not a rocket science experiment.

Without the “before and after” comparison, the research is meaningless. It is like saying, “People who see a medical doctor frequently have poorer health.”, it is true, but obviously one cannot conclude that medical doctors cause poor health!

Lastly, the research is analysing PISA data (Programme for International Student Assessment). Clearly, there is no tuition centre tutoring PISA, which is significantly different from the ordinary curriculum (I was a PISA grader). As tuition is highly specialized, it is true that tuition can have close to zero effect on PISA scores. It is like PSLE / O Level Math tuition has close to no effect on Math Olympiad scores; even if it is both “Math”, it is possible to score full marks in PSLE / O Level Math but zero marks in Olympiad Math!

Maths Tuition – What are the Benefits?

Maths Tuition – What are the Benefits?

Maths tuition brings about many benefits that can be seen for the parent, the teacher and especially the student who is struggling with their mathematics subject in school. For starters, it will have a huge impact for the student because their entire future can depend on their academic performance in PSLE, O-level, and A-level examinations – all of which requires the student to take the math subject.

For young kids, academics and performance in school can be everything. Their self-esteem and pride depends on it and it helps to guide them in the right direction. Performing well in all subjects helps us to determine who they will become in the future and what they wish to achieve. However, this can be difficult to do when the poor child is struggling in school, particularly in mathematics. Having the opportunity to participate in private maths tuition can help a student get back on the right track once again.

Maths tuition can be extremely useful for Singaporean parents as well. While we all try our best to help our students be successful, there are simply some areas where we are not knowledgeable enough to help out very much. A lot of parents are simply not equipped enough in maths to be able to guide our children adequately. There are also many changes to the education system such the newer and harder syllabuses that can hinder our ability to help our kids as well.

However, with a private maths tutor, our kids can learn the proper way to craft mathematics answers, draw models, and solve algebraic questions, developing the tools necessary to help them succeed in their mathematics exam. Doing well in mathematics not only helps students regain their confidence and improve their T-scores, it also helps them in the long-run as they develop into working adults, as mental arithmetic ability is useful in many practical situations. A good maths tutor can use their expertise to help guide students back onto the right path so that all of their goals and dreams can become a reality.

Teachers can also benefit from private tuition as well. Since a teacher has many students that they are required to teach at one time, it is difficult for them to have the time necessary to devote to one struggling student. However, when students in the class engage their own private maths tutor from a maths tuition agency, the teacher will not have to focus too much on that one student, hindering any of the other children in the classroom as well.

With the right tuition agency, parents can engage private maths tuition in any location and there are benefits for everyone involved. Also, if the mathematics tutors are specialized; meaning if your student is struggling in math, a private maths tuition teacher can help to bring their grades up and to catch them up with the remainder of the class.

Maths tutors are great for all age groups and can even be beneficial for those in university as well. Choosing to engage private maths tuition for your child is a great decision, and whether you are a student, parent or teacher, a good maths tutor help to make everyone’s lives a little better.

What holiday? More kids spending school break at tuition centres

Full article: http://www.tnp.sg/news/singapore-news/more-parents-sending-their-children-study-between-terms

Interesting article with some points to ponder. One quote seems true: “Force-feeding children to learn during their holidays might cause them to develop a resistance to it. This is why some children have low resiliency levels and they eventually don’t want to study.”

Self-motivation is very important for learning, otherwise the child may go for the tuition classes but end up daydreaming during lesson. Check out some motivational books which can motivate your child and improve English at the same time: https://mathtuition88.com/2014/11/16/motivational-books-for-the-student-educational/

Jack, 12, in his own words

We would always go on holidays in June and December, for as long as I can remember.

But in May, when I asked Mummy where we were going in June, I heard the bad news.

She said she was worried and stressed because I had done badly for my term one papers, getting only Bs and Cs.

“We’re not going anywhere,” she said. “You have to study.”

I feel her decision is unfair because I know how to manage my time.

She wants me to get in the school of her choice through Direct School Admission (DSA) – that is why she insisted that I must still continue with my piano and wushu lessons on Sundays.

I used to have tuition only for Mother Tongue and Maths. Now, plus all that, I have to go for intensive study sessions for Mother Tongue, Maths and English.

But Mummy does not know that having different teachers makes it more confusing for me.

I cannot focus and they both tell me different things, so I don’t know how to answer the questions best.

I wish we could travel as a family. I’m sad that we are not travelling this time.

Travelling could have been a fun time for me to recharge and then I can focus on the BIG PSLE.

I know Mummy has my welfare and well-being in mind, but it is also hard to pretend that I do not mind.

Just yesterday, I asked if I can have one day free before the holidays are over to go to Universal Studios Singapore (USS) and she said very angrily: “NO.”

She said that I do not know how to prioritise my needs. I feel she is unfair.

She keeps telling me it is “just for a few months”. But June is just one month, and it is the holidays.

Anyway, I hope I can get into DSA so my suffering can be lessened and Mummy will take me on a holiday after PSLE.

She told me I have to set a good example for Mei Mei (Mandarin for sister).

I hope I can.

– See more at: http://www.tnp.sg/news/singapore-news/more-parents-sending-their-children-study-between-terms#sthash.CgqYD8XP.dpuf

This parent has hit the nail on the head regarding tuition

Source: http://www.straitstimes.com/forum/letters-on-the-web/tuition-still-effective-for-many

This parent has hit the nail on the head (find exactly the right answer) regarding tuition:

Whether tuition yields results largely depends on pupils’ attitudes towards learning and how motivated they are.

In conclusion, tuition is necessary and can be effective if pupils make full use of it. But parents still need to decide for themselves if tuition is the answer for their children, and not be influenced by societal pressure.

Read the article for the full letter.

Singapore Tuition Forum News Compilation

Compilation of Interesting Articles on Tuition

Recently, there have been many news on the Straits Times Forum / other newspapers / internet on the phenomenon of tuition in Singapore. There are many mixed opinions on tuition, which are discussed in depth in those articles. I have picked the most interesting articles on the subject of tuition, which would be a familiar topic in Singapore, as 70% or more of Singaporean students have tuition. The links are found near the bottom of the post.

Personally, I think of tutors like a sports coach, like a swimming coach or a badminton coach. Sports coaches help their students to play the sport better. Tuition teachers help their students to perform in the exams better. There are great similarities between their roles. Currently, almost all top athletes would have a coach, it would be unthinkable for an athlete at the international level not to have a coach.

Tuition has also been around since thousands of years ago. Alexander the Great’s father hired Aristotle as a tutor for his son. The Imperial Tutor in ancient China is an extremely prestigious post and is often awarded only to the top scholar in the imperial exams. His job is to tutor the future emperor or other princes / princesses. (See this example of an Imperial Tutor in China). In the past, only the rich and wealthy could afford tutors. However, due to the prosperity in many first world countries like Singapore and South Korea, affording tuition is becoming increasingly possible even for the middle class.


Note: I am currently not giving tuition at the moment, but I have a good recommendation for a very good tuition agency. Interested readers can email me at mathtuition88@gmail.com.


 Links of Top 10 News Articles on Tuition

  1. 7 in 10 parents send their children for tuition: ST poll
  2. Does tuition help or hinder? (Straits Times)
  3. Tuition is popular due to education system issues (ST)
  4. Tuition is comforting for some parents, kids (ST)
  5. Tuition has become an educational arms race (ST)
  6. Tuition a necessary evil (ST)
  7. He goes for tuition …and he’s in poly (ST)
  8. Tuition In Singapore: Is It Necessarily Bad? (Blog)
  9. Singapore’s Young School Children Are Burdened With Excessive Private Tuition (Blog)
  10. The Tuition Dilemma (NTU)

As a former tutor, I don’t really think that tuition (in moderation) can be harmful, like what some of the articles claim. Back to the analogy of sports coaches, it is illogical to suppose that a sport student’s badminton skills can worsen and deteriorate after practice with a qualified coach. That would simply make no sense! Similarly, as long as the tutor is competent and not teaching the wrong thing, it would simply be illogical to say that tuition can harm academic performance. It would be really strange if a student becomes worse at math after more practice.

The key to successful life is balance. A role model for children would be Jeremy Lin, the Asian American basketball player. Highly intelligent and an excellent student, he has been admitted and graduated successfully from Harvard. He is also a professional basketball player in the NBA, and at the peak of physical fitness. He is also a humble and devout Christian. He is one guy that all students should take as a role model.

Book on Jeremy Lin:


Jeremy Lin: The Reason for the Linsanity

Graphic design & Fashion degree Programmes

To all Singaporean readers and parents,

We are proud to recommend some excellent Graphic Design and Fashion Degree Programmes, by First Media Design School. The degree is being conferred by the University of the West of England, Bristol.

For those who are interested to enroll in this school, please contact me (Mr Wu) at mathtuition88@gmail.com. I have some extra information booklets about the course provided by the company, and will be pleased to guide you in the registration process.

Once again, if you are interested to enroll, please contact me as soon as possible. Thanks!

fashion poster

Finding E Maths or A Maths Difficult?

Are you finding Elementary Maths (E Maths) or Additional Maths (A Maths) Difficult?

Do not be discouraged if you find E Maths or A Maths difficult. The main reason why you are finding it to be difficult is that it is new. You have not gotten enough exposure to the type of questions asked. It is like learning to ride a bicycle, at the start it is difficult and you may even fall down. But after you have mastered riding the bicycle, you will be able to ride as fast as you wish. You need to get over the initial difficulty of learning in order to master the art of riding the bicycle.

At our Group Tuition at Bishan, we constantly practice actual exam questions, be it on Trigonometry, Differentiation or Integration (A Maths), or Vectors, Matrices and Probability (E Maths). We learn different methods to check and do the questions. You will find out, at last, that once you master the art of solving O Level questions, all the O Level questions are just repackaging the same questions in different forms. Once you know how to do one question, you will know how to do all similar questions. Expanding your repertoire of questions you know will enable you to get that coveted “A”. Constant practice, as opposed to cramming one month before the O Levels, is absolutely necessary to avoid panic and to consolidate our Mathematical memory.

Some Math formulas like the quotient rule, \displaystyle\frac{d}{dx}(\frac{u}{v})=\frac{v\frac{du}{dx}-u\frac{dv}{dx}}{v^2}, you will automatically memorize it once you have done enough practice.

In the end, you may even find that E Maths or A Maths is easy!


Motivational Story to motivate you

(Source: http://www.indianchild.com/inspiring_stories.htm)

THE OBSTACLE IN OUR PATH
In ancient times, a king had a boulder placed on a roadway. Then he hid himself and watched to see if anyone would remove the huge rock. Some of the king’s wealthiest merchants and courtiers came by and simply walked around it.

Many loudly blamed the king for not keeping the roads clear, but none did anything about getting the big stone out of the way. Then a peasant came along carrying a load of vegetables. On approaching the boulder, the peasant laid down his burden and tried to move the stone to the side of the road. After much pushing and straining, he finally succeeded. As the peasant picked up his load of vegetables, he noticed a purse lying in the road where the boulder had been. The purse contained many gold coins and a note from the king indicating that the gold was for the person who removed the boulder from the roadway. The peasant learned what many others never understand.

Every obstacle presents an opportunity to improve one’s condition.


Chinese Version

石头的故事

从前有一个国王,他故意派人搬来一块大石头放在道路中间。然后这个国王躲在旁边静静地观察,想知道是否会有人过来把这块大石头搬走。有几个富有的商人经过这块石头,只是直接绕过它。之后又来了几个人,他们只是埋怨国王居然没有找人来清理道路,然后仍然是绕过这块巨石走掉了。又过了一会,一个农夫经过这里,他身上背着沉甸甸的蔬菜。走到巨石的前面,把身上背的蔬菜放下,然后试着去把这块巨大的石头移到道路的旁边。农夫竭尽全力去推那块巨石,终于成功得把石头推到道路的一侧。农夫背起蔬菜准备继续赶路,却发现石头原来所在的地方下面有一个袋子。农夫好奇得打开袋子,里面有许多金币还有一个纸条。纸条是国王留下的,原来金币是用来奖励移走石头的人。
这个小故事讲述了一个简单的道理:困境也有可能是机会。遇到困难的时候,有些人会像商人那样,直接选择放弃。有些人会像那几个埋怨者,只会抱怨却不想着付出行动来改变现状。很少人会像故事中的农夫那样选择迎难而上。然而,最终收获最多的往往就是这部分迎难而上的人。
平常生活中和工作中也是这样,遇到问题,首先要不抛弃不放弃,积极寻求解决方法。无休止的抱怨只会白白错失机会,抱怨多了,好运气也会绕道而行。在困境中寻找机会方法,在挫折中吸取经验教训,那么就会很容易走出困境了,说不定还会有意外的收获哦!