Homeschool Math Challenging Puzzles

The questions listed are also very suitable as PSLE Challenging Math Problem Sums.

Basically, for Grade 2-4, they are very challenging.

For Grade 6 (Primary 6, 12 year old students), they are challenging math questions.

Do give it a try and see if your child can solve it!

Singapore Maths Tuition

Homeschool Math Challenging Questions

Mathtuition88 will be starting a series of Homeschool Math Challenging Problems, aimed at age 8 to 10 (Grade 2 to 4).

This series is targeted at kids age 8 to 10 who are strong / gifted at mathematics and wish to further stretch their potential. It is also useful for children who may not be strong in math at the moment, but have a keen interest in math nonetheless.

In particular, it is very suitable for the following purposes:

  • Homeschooling for gifted kids
  • Preparation for GEP (Gifted Education Programme) screening and selection tests
  • Preparation for Math Olympiad
  • Puzzles for kids interested in math but find school work too easy.
  • PSLE challenging Math problem sums. The questions are also well within the PSLE Math Syllabus, and will be challenging to Primary 6 students as well.

This series of questions will follow the Singapore Math syllabus for Grade…

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Should I take H1 or H2 Maths?

There are pros and cons of taking H1 or H2 Maths:

H1 Maths is an easier version, and will definitely take less time to study. This time can be used for studying other subjects. Also, it covers statistics which can come in handy for majors like Psychology, Social Science, or Business. Students who take A Maths in O Level will find that the Pure Math part of H1 Maths is basically the same, if not even easier than O level A Maths.

H2 Maths is the harder version, more difficult than even the O Level A Maths. New and interesting topics like Complex Numbers and Vectors will lay a good foundation for University majors like Engineering and Physics. Try not to forget what you have learnt in O Level A Maths, it will come in handy.

Students who wish to enter SMU & take H1 Maths in JC may want to note that SMU has a introductory module on calculus which is pretty much compulsory, even for majors like social science. I have taught a student from SMU, and would say that the content is heavier than even H2 Math Calculus; there is multivariable calculus in the SMU Course.


Featured Book:

Secrets of Mental Math: The Mathemagician’s Guide to Lightning Calculation and Amazing Math Tricks

Topics coming out for A Maths Paper 2

Recently, the A Maths Paper 2 just finished (today), and the A Maths Paper 2 is hot on its heels, coming tomorrow!

Usually, topics tested in Paper 1 will most likely not come out again in Paper 2, so students doing their last minute revision can use this fact to focus their revision.

Topics that came out in Paper 1:

  1. Binomial Theorem
  2. Trigonometry (Addition Formula, find exact value)
  3. Rate of change
  4. Partial Fractions
  5. Linear Law
  6. Prove Trigonometry
  7. Coordinate Geometry
  8. Integrate & Differentiate Trigonometric Functions
  9. Discriminant (b^2-4ac)
  10. Stationary Points
  11. Tangent/Normal
  12. Quadratic/Modulus

Topics likely to come out in Paper 2:

  1. Indices/Surds
  2. Polynomials
  3. Exponential / Logarithmic Equations
  4. R-formula
  5. Sketching of Trigonometric Graphs
  6. Circles
  7. Proofs in plane geometry
  8. Integration as the reverse of differentiation
  9. Area under curve
  10. Kinematics

All the best for those who are taking the A Maths Paper 2 exam tomorrow. 🙂

Love Math Graphs!

How to remember graphs?

Many students have a hard time remembering how graphs look like.

Here is a humorous cartoon (suitable for Valentine’s Day) on how some graphs look like!

Remember, Maths is not just about exams, homework, or getting A1/A2. Maths, above all, is about the LOVE of learning and thinking.

math graphs


Featured book:

Love and Math: The Heart of Hidden Reality

A New York Times Science Bestseller

What if you had to take an art class in which you were only taught how to paint a fence? What if you were never shown the paintings of van Gogh and Picasso, weren’t even told they existed? Alas, this is how math is taught, and so for most of us it becomes the intellectual equivalent of watching paint dry.

In Love and Math, renowned mathematician Edward Frenkel reveals a side of math we’ve never seen, suffused with all the beauty and elegance of a work of art. In this heartfelt and passionate book, Frenkel shows that mathematics, far from occupying a specialist niche, goes to the heart of all matter, uniting us across cultures, time, and space.

Love and Math tells two intertwined stories: of the wonders of mathematics and of one young man’s journey learning and living it. Having braved a discriminatory educational system to become one of the twenty-first century’s leading mathematicians, Frenkel now works on one of the biggest ideas to come out of math in the last 50 years: the Langlands Program. Considered by many to be a Grand Unified Theory of mathematics, the Langlands Program enables researchers to translate findings from one field to another so that they can solve problems, such as Fermat’s last theorem, that had seemed intractable before.

At its core, Love and Math is a story about accessing a new way of thinking, which can enrich our lives and empower us to better understand the world and our place in it. It is an invitation to discover the magic hidden universe of mathematics.

 

5 Tips on How to improve for Maths (Primary, O Level, A Level)

5 Tips on How to improve for Maths (Primary, O Level, A Level)

  1. Firstly, make sure that you do sufficient practice, especially for past year papers. Sometimes, students may think that they fully understood a topic, but there may be some gaps in their knowledge, which would be overcome by sufficient practice. Check out our site on Free Exam Papers.
  2. Improve accuracy and reduce careless mistakes. Some tips to reduce careless mistakes are double-checking, and write neatly to reduce transfer or reading error. Also, check out our article on reducing careless mistakes.
  3. Ensure adequate understanding. Ensure that each step of the question is being understood, and not relying on “guessing” or pure luck. This will enable the student to solve all similar questions of the same type. Having a good tutor, a study group of friends, or a parent knowledgeable in mathematics helps a lot.
  4. Have a positive attitude about Maths. 🙂 Liking Maths helps a lot in doing well for Maths. Treat Maths like a game or puzzle to be solved, and not as a chore. Congratulate yourself after solving a question correctly, no matter how easy or basic it is. Soon, you will be able to experience the joy of Mathematics.
  5. Finally, try to have a healthy lifestyle. Reduce harmful activities like too much computer games, as these can cause addiction and affect dopamine receptors in the brain, which hamper learning. Exercise and listening to music are good activities for soothing and relaxing the brain.