Princeton Professor Predicts 99% Chance for Hillary Clinton to Win

Source: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/sam-wang-princeton-election-consortium-poll-hillary-clinton-donald-trump-victory-a7399671.html

A survey from the Princeton Election Consortium has found that Hillary Clinton has a 99 per cent chance of winning the election over Donald Trump.

Three days before the election, Ms Clinton has a projected 312 electoral votes, compared to 226 for Mr Trump. A total of 270 electoral votes are needed to win.

The probability statistic was found by the university’s statistical Bayesian model.

The developer of the model, neuro and data scientist Princeton professor Sam Wang, correctly predicted 49 out of 50 states in 2012.

Donald Trump’s Answer to Math Question: 2+2=?

Source: http://www.attn.com/stories/6407/george-takei-impersonates-donald-trump

Question: What is 2+2?

Answer:

“I have to say a lot of people have been asking this question. No, really. A lot of people come up to me and they ask me. They say, ‘What’s 2+2’? And I tell them look, we know what 2+2 is. We’ve had almost eight years of the worst kind of math you can imagine. Oh my God, I can’t believe it. Addition and subtraction of the 1s the 2s and the 3s. It’s terrible. It’s just terrible. Look, if you want to know what 2+2 is, do you want to know what 2+2 is? I’ll tell you. First of all the number 2, by the way, I love the number 2. It’s probably my favorite number, no it is my favorite number. You know what, it’s probably more like the number two but with a lot of zeros behind it. A lot. If I’m being honest, I mean, if I’m being honest. I like a lot of zeros. Except for Marco Rubio, now he’s a zero that I don’t like. Though, I probably shouldn’t say that. He’s a nice guy but he’s like, ‘10101000101,’ on and on, like that. He’s like a computer! You know what I mean? He’s like a computer. I don’t know. I mean, you know. So, we have all these numbers, and we can add them and subtract them and add them. TIMES them even. Did you know that? We can times them OR divide them, they don’t tell you that, and I’ll tell you, no one is better at the order of operations than me. You wouldn’t believe it. So, we’re gonna be the best on 2+2, believe me.”

Credit: Original Author Steven Edwards.

The Boy With The Incredible Brain – Autism Math Documentary

This is the breathtaking story of Daniel Tammet. A twenty-something with extraordinary mental abilities, Daniel is one of the world’s few savants. He can do calculations to 100 decimal places in his head, and learn a language in a week.

He also meets the world’s most famous savant, the man who inspired Dustin Hoffman’s character in the Oscar winning film ‘Rain Man’.

This documentary follows Daniel as he travels to America to meet the scientists who are convinced he may hold the key to unlocking similar abilities in everyone.


Featured books by Daniel Tammet:

Born On A Blue Day: Inside the Extraordinary Mind of an Autistic Savant

Bestselling author Daniel Tammet (Thinking in Numbers) is virtually unique among people who have severe autistic disorders in that he is capable of living a fully independent life and able to explain what is happening inside his head.

He sees numbers as shapes, colors, and textures, and he can perform extraordinary calculations in his head. He can learn to speak new languages fluently, from scratch, in a week. In 2004, he memorized and recited more than 22,000 digits of pi, setting a record. He has savant syndrome, an extremely rare condition that gives him the most unimaginable mental powers, much like those portrayed by Dustin Hoffman in the film Rain Man.



Thinking In Numbers: On Life, Love, Meaning, and Math

The irresistibly engaging book that “enlarges one’s wonder at Tammet’s mind and his all-embracing vision of the world as grounded in numbers.” –Oliver Sacks, MD
THINKING IN NUMBERS is the book that Daniel Tammet, mathematical savant and bestselling author, was born to write. In Tammet’s world, numbers are beautiful and mathematics illuminates our lives and minds. Using anecdotes, everyday examples, and ruminations on history, literature, and more, Tammet allows us to share his unique insights and delight in the way numbers, fractions, and equations underpin all our lives.

 

 

PISA 2012: Shanghai VS Singapore

Source: http://edition.cnn.com/2013/12/03/world/asia/pisa-education-study/

Shanghai teens top international education ranking, OECD says

By Sophie Brown, CNN
December 3, 2013 — Updated 2051 GMT (0451 HKT)

(CNN) — When it comes to mathematics, reading and science, young people in Shanghai are the best in the world, according to a global education survey released Tuesday.

In all three subjects, Shanghai students demonstrated knowledge and skills equivalent to at least one additional year of schooling than their peers in countries like the United States, Germany and the United Kingdom.

In math, Shanghai had the highest score with 613 points — the equivalent of nearly three years of schooling above the average for the 34 OECD member countries of 494, and six years above Peru which ranked last with a score of 368. The city also came top in 2009 rankings.

Singapore came second in mathematics with a score of 573, followed by Hong Kong, Taiwan, South Korea, and Macau.

U.S. lags

The United States ranked 36th, performing below the OECD average in mathematics with 481 points, and a score indistinguishable from the average for reading and science.

Part of the reason pupils do so well in Shanghai, according to the OECD’s deputy director of education, Andreas Schleicher, is that they have the drive and confidence to fulfill their potential.

“In China and Shanghai, you have nine out of ten students telling you, ‘It depends on me. If I invest the effort, my teachers are going to help me to be successful’,” Schleicher told CNN’s On China program, which will air later this month.

Continue reading at http://edition.cnn.com/2013/12/03/world/asia/pisa-education-study/

Check out the list of recommended books at: https://mathtuition88.com/recommended-maths-books/

Math, Science, Reading Scores Show U.S. Schools Slipping Behind

Source: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/extra/features/us/july-dec10/education_12-10.html

Math, Science, Reading Scores Show U.S. Schools Slipping Behind

Posted: December 10, 2010 PRINTER FRIENDLY VERSION: PDF

The United States received a stark wake-up call this week with the release of international test results showing students in other countries are surpassing American students when it comes to math, science and reading. China and Australia outperformed the U.S. in each of the three subject areas tested.

The results of a major international education assessment show that American students are lagging behind many other countries in crucial skills like reading, math and science.

“The United States came in 23rd or 24th in most subjects. We can quibble, or we can face the brutal truth that we’re being out-educated,” said U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan.

Test compares U.S. to other countries

The PISA tests how advanced students are in science, math and reading compared to their peers around the world.

The test, known as the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), directly assesses how prepared teenagers are in math, science and reading compared to their peers in other countries.
The test is translated into each country’s language, and officials from the participating countries are able to review questions before students take the exam to make sure each test is fair and unbiased.

In the U.S., the participating schools and students are randomly selected. On average, about 4,500 students are tested in each of the participating countries.

China and Finland lead the way

Chinese and Finnish students scored highest on the PISA test.

Each PISA subject area is scored on a scale where 500 points is the average. The results announced this week show many countries outperforming the U.S. Here’s a sample:

Math: China 600, Germany 513, United States 487 (31st place)

Reading: China 556, Korea 539, United States 500 (17th place)

Science: China 575, Finland 554, United States 502 (23rd place)

The results of a major international education assessment show that  American students are lagging behind many other countries in crucial skills like reading, math and science.

Continue reading at http://www.pbs.org/newshour/extra/features/us/july-dec10/education_12-10.html

Performing well in math is generally a result of hard work, not innate skill

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jordan-lloyd-bookey/getting-a-d-in-mathand-th_b_4220609.html

Recently, I read this article in The Atlantic about the myth of being innately “bad at math,” and how performing well in math is generally a result of hard work, not innate skill. By all accounts, I should have known this, but it only took that one semester to break down years of confidence in my aptitude. In the article, the author notes several patterns we see that reinforce this myth. The one that resonated most with me was as follows:

“The well-prepared kids, not realizing that the B students were simply unprepared, assume that they are ‘math people,’ and work hard in the future, cementing their advantage.”

And the B students (or in my case D student), well, they assume it’s about skill level and from that point forward it’s a self-fulfilling prophecy.

My mentor convinced me to apply to business school, and when he asked why I wouldn’t apply to Wharton, I said, “too quantitative.” I was scared. But he convinced me to apply, and after a crash course in Calculus, I learned that if I worked hard enough, indeed I could have success… even when my classmates were so-called quant jocks.

For me, it worked out, but for millions of kids in our education system, the ending isn’t so happy. Instead, parents determine at a very young age that a child has or does not have math skills. And, I would argue, they — we — do the same with reading. We decide that it’s one or the other, left or right brain. Instead, we can acknowledge our kids’ struggles with a particular subject, while continuing to encourage and remind them that a consistent effort can make a tremendous difference, but it takes perseverance.

What do I wish my teacher had done? I wish he had told me that I could do everything my classmates were doing, but I lacked the preparation before I ever stepped foot in his classroom.  If only he had instilled that confidence in me, that simple knowing that I could do better, who knows what else I might have tackled coming out of high school.

The ‘I’m bad at math’ myth

Source: http://www.dallasnews.com/opinion/sunday-commentary/20131108-the-im-bad-at-math-myth.ece?nclick_check=1

Dansk: Dedikeret til matematik

For high school math, inborn talent is much less important than hard work, preparation and self-confidence.

How do we know this? First of all, both of us have taught math for many years — as professors, teaching assistants and private tutors. Again and again, we have seen the following pattern repeat itself:

Different kids with different levels of preparation come into a math class. Some of these kids have parents who have drilled them on math from a young age, while others never had that kind of parental input.

On the first few tests, the well-prepared kids get perfect scores, while the unprepared kids get only what they could figure out by winging it — maybe 80 or 85 percent, a solid B.

The unprepared kids, not realizing that the top scorers were well-prepared, assume that genetic ability was what determined the performance differences. Deciding that they “just aren’t math people,” they don’t try hard in future classes and fall further behind.

The well-prepared kids, not realizing that the B students were simply unprepared, assume that they are “math people,” and work hard in the future, cementing their advantage.

Thus, people’s belief that math ability can’t change becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.

So why do we focus on math? For one thing, math skills are increasingly important for getting good jobs these days — so believing you can’t learn math is especially self-destructive. But we also believe that math is the area where America’s “fallacy of inborn ability” is the most entrenched. Math is the great mental bogeyman of an unconfident America. If we can convince you that anyone can learn math, it should be a short step to convincing you that you can learn just about anything, if you work hard enough.

Is America more susceptible than other nations to the dangerous idea of genetic math ability? Here our evidence is only anecdotal, but we suspect that this is the case. While American fourth- and eighth-graders score quite well in international math comparisons — beating countries like Germany, the U.K. and Sweden — our high-schoolers underperform those countries by a wide margin. This suggests that Americans’ native ability is just as good as anyone’s, but that we fail to capitalize on that ability through hard work.

In response to the lackluster high school math performance, some influential voices in American education policy have suggested simply teaching less math — for example, Andrew Hacker has called for algebra to no longer be a requirement. The subtext, of course, is that large numbers of American kids are simply not born with the ability to solve for x.

We believe that this approach is disastrous and wrong. First of all, it leaves many Americans ill-prepared to compete in a global marketplace with hardworking foreigners. But even more important, it may contribute to inequality. A great deal of research has shown that technical skills in areas like software are increasingly making the difference between America’s upper middle class and its working class. While we don’t think education is a cure-all for inequality, we definitely believe that in an increasingly automated workplace, Americans who give up on math are selling themselves short.

Too many Americans go through life terrified of equations and mathematical symbols. What many of them are afraid of is “proving” themselves to be genetically inferior by failing to instantly comprehend the equations (when, of course, in reality, even a math professor would have to read closely). So they recoil from anything that looks like math, protesting: “I’m not a math person.” And so they exclude themselves from quite a few lucrative career opportunities. This has to stop.

Good night’s sleep adds up to better exam results – especially in maths

To all students taking Maths exams, do have a good night’s sleep before the exam!

Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/5486844/Good-nights-sleep-adds-up-to-better-exam-results-especially-in-maths.html

Researchers found that higher scores were related to greater sleep quality, especially less awakenings rather than the actual length of time asleep.

The team of researchers, led by Dr Jennifer Cousins at the University of Pittsburgh, studied 56 adolescents and compared their sleep patterns with their exam grades.

They found those that enjoyed deeper, less disturbed, sleep were the most successful, especially in maths but also in English and history. 

Those who fell asleep and awoke easily – especially at weekends – were found to have better exam results.

Higher maths scores were related to less night awakenings, less time spent in bed, higher sleep efficiency and great sleep quality.

NUS Maths Alumnus Dr Yeo Sze Ling mentioned in National Day Rally 2013

Ad: Maths Group Tuition available in 2014

Dr Yeo Sze Ling is sincerely a good example of perseverance for all Maths students, including myself!

(Go to 01h18m50s)

Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06PdmOSrboU#t=01h18m50s

Quote: http://sg.news.yahoo.com/pm-lee-tears-up-at-emotional-national-day-rally-with–heart–160531376.html

But perhaps the most memorable moment of all was when Lee became visibly emotional after sharing the heartwarming success story of visually handicapped A-star researcher Dr Yeo Sze Ling.

“Sze Ling proves that you can do well if you try hard, no matter what your circumstances, and that is also how we can contribute back to society, to keep the system fair for all,” said Lee, who then visibly teared and choked up,  but quickly composed himself.

PM Lee was emphasising the importance of meritocracy in Singapore’s education system, which he acknowledged needed more changes — for example, it can be more holistic and less competitive.

 

You can reach for the stars with Jaws, Braille and determination, mathematics whiz Yeo Sze Ling tells HELLEN TAN

Maths Group Tuition starting in 2014!

Source: http://ww1.math.nus.edu.sg/News%20Archive/2005,%2024%20May%20-%20Counting%20on%20her%20mind%20-%20Yeo%20Sze%20Ling.htm

Counting on her mind

1,248 words 24 May 2005 Digital Life English (c) 2005 Singapore Press Holdings Limited

You can reach for the stars with Jaws, Braille and determination, mathematics whiz Yeo Sze Ling tells HELLEN TAN

Given that multiple degrees are common today, the fact that Miss Yeo Sze Ling has two degrees in mathematics, and is working on her doctorate in the same field, is probably not news.

Until you find out that she is blind.

The 27-year-old who earned her Bachelor’s degree (Honours) and a Master’s degree from National University of Singapore (NUS) is now into research on coding mathematics theories and cryptography.

These are used in computing algorithms to protect passwords or data from being stolen when they are zipped from computer to computer.

The field is an interest she shares with John Nash Jr, a mathematical genius who won a Nobel Prize, portrayed in the Oscar-winning movie, A Beautiful Mind.

Certainly, like Nash, her achievements should mean a lot.

He was a schizophrenic who thought he was doing secret cryptography work for the American government.

She has been blind from the age of about four when glaucoma struck. Glaucoma is a condition that increases pressure within the eyeball causing sight loss.

Technology has come in handy.

On campus, she totes a laptop.

At home in a four-room HDB flat in Bishan, her desktop Compaq PC holds today’s tech staples – e-mail and MSN Messenger for exchanging notes with friends.

The Internet is her source for research as well as for online newspapers or electronic books like A Beautiful Mind.

Continue reading at http://ww1.math.nus.edu.sg/News%20Archive/2005,%2024%20May%20-%20Counting%20on%20her%20mind%20-%20Yeo%20Sze%20Ling.htm

Sergey Brin, co-founder of Google, studied Mathematics!

Maths Group Tuition to start in 2014!

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergey_Brin

Sergey Mikhaylovich Brin (Russian: Сергей Михайлович Брин; born August 21, 1973) is an American computer scientist and Internet entrepreneur who, with Larry Page, co-founded Google, one of the most profitable Internet companies.[4] As of 2013, his personal wealth was estimated to be $22.8billion.[2] Together, Brin and Page own about 16 percent of the company.

Brin immigrated to the United States with his family from the Soviet Union at the age of six. He earned his undergraduate degree at the University of Maryland, following in his father’s and grandfather’s footsteps by studying mathematics, as well as computer science. After graduation, he moved to Stanford University to acquire a Ph.D. in computer science. There he met Larry Page, with whom he later became friends. They crammed their dormitory room with inexpensive computers and applied Brin’s data mining system to build a superior search engine. The program became popular at Stanford and they suspended their PhD studies to start up Google in a rented garage.

The Economist newspaper referred to Brin as an “Enlightenment Man“, and someone who believes that “knowledge is always good, and certainly always better than ignorance”, a philosophy that is summed up by Google’s motto “Organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful”[5][6] and “Don’t be evil“.

Education in the United States

Brin attended grade school at Paint Branch Montessori School in Adelphi, Maryland, but he received further education at home; his father, a professor in the department of mathematics at the University of Maryland, encouraged him to learn mathematics and his family helped him retain his Russian-language skills. In September 1990 Brin enrolled in the University of Maryland to study computer science and mathematics, where he received his Bachelor of Science in May 1993 with honors.[14]

Sergey Brin Ted 2010.jpg

Geometry and Abraham Lincoln; O Level Maths Tuition Group

Source: http://www.mathopenref.com/euclid.html

At age forty, Abraham Lincoln studied Euclid for training in reasoning, and as a traveling lawyer on horseback, kept a copy of Euclid’s Elements in his saddlebag.  In his biography of Lincoln, his law partner Billy Herndon tells how late at night Lincoln would lie on the floor studying Euclid’s geometry by lamplight. Lincoln’s logical speeches and some of his phrases such as “dedicated to the proposition” in the  Gettysburg address are attributed to his reading of Euclid.

Lincoln explains why he was motivated to read Euclid:

“In the course of my law reading I constantly came upon the word “demonstrate”.  I thought at first that I understood its meaning, but soon became satisfied that I did not.  I said to myself, What do I do when I demonstrate more than when I reason or prove? How does demonstration differ from any other proof?
I consulted Webster’s Dictionary. They told of ‘certain proof,’ ‘proof beyond the possibility of doubt’;  but I could form no idea of what sort of proof that was. I thought a great many things were proved beyond the possibility of doubt, without recourse to any such extraordinary process of reasoning as I understood demonstration to be.  I consulted all the dictionaries and books of reference I could find, but with no better results.  You might as well have defined blue to a blind man.
At last I said,- Lincoln, you never can make a lawyer if you do not understand what demonstrate means;  and I left my situation in Springfield, went home to my father’s house,  and stayed there till I could give any proposition in the six books of Euclid at sight.  I then found out what demonstrate means, and went back to my law studies.”
Iconic black and white photograph of Lincoln showing his head and shoulders.

List of JCs in Singapore; H2 Maths Tuition

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_schools_in_Singapore#Junior_Colleges_.28JC.29

Junior Colleges (JC)

These offer two-year courses leading to the GCE A-level examination.

Code Zone College Name Established Address Type Special Programmes
English Chinese Abb.
0705 North Anderson Junior College 安德逊初级学院 AJC 1984 4500 Ang Mo Kio Avenue 6 Government
7001 West Anglo-Chinese School (Independent) IB World School 英华中学 (自主) ACS(I)-IBDP 2004 (IBDP) 121 Dover Road Independent IP, MEP
0803 West Anglo-Chinese Junior College 英华初级学院 ACJC 1977 25 Dover Close East Government-Aided MEP, DEP(TSD), LEP (EL)
0802 South Catholic Junior College 公教初级学院 CJC 1975 129 Whitley Road Government-Aided LEP (EL)
3101 East Dunman High School 德明政府中学 DHS 2005 – IP 10 Tanjong Rhu Road Autonomous IP, MEP, BSP, LEP (CL), AEP
0806 Central Hwa Chong Institution 华侨中学 HCI 1974 661 Bukit Timah Road Independent IP, HP, LEP (CL), AEP, BSP
0713 North Innova Junior College 星烁初级学院 IJC 2005 21 Champions Way Government LEP (ML)
0703 West Jurong Junior College 裕廊初级学院 JJC 1981 800 Corporation Road Government LEP (CL)
0712 East Meridian Junior College 美廉初级学院 MJC 2003 21 Pasir Ris Street 71 Government
0908 West Millennia Institute 励仁高级中学 MI 2004 60 Bukit Batok West Avenue 8 Government DTP
0805 North Nanyang Junior College 南洋初级学院 NYJC 1978 128 Serangoon Avenue 3 Government-Aided LEP (CL), AEP
0712 Central National Junior College 国家初级学院 NJC 1969 37 Hillcrest Road Government IP, HP, AEP, MEP, STaR
7801 West NUS High School of Mathematics and Science 新加坡国立大学附属数理中学 NUSHS 2005 20 Clementi Ave 1 Independent IP, DIP
0711 West Pioneer Junior College 先驱初级学院 PJC 1999 21 Teck Whye Walk Government
0704 South Raffles Institution 莱佛士初级学院 RI 1826 10 Bishan Street 21 Independent IP, HP, LEP (JL), LEP (EL), MEP, TSD
3103 West River Valley High School 立化中学 RVHS 1956 2006 – IP 6 Boon Lay Avenue Autonomous IP, BSP
0710 North Serangoon Junior College 实龙岗初级学院 SRJC 1988 1033 Upper Serangoon Road Government
0804 South Saint Andrew’s Junior College 圣安德烈初级学院 SAJC 1978 55 Potong Pasir Avenue 1 Government-Aided
0709 East Tampines Junior College 淡滨尼初级学院 TPJC 1986 2 Tampines Avenue 9 Government LEP (ML), TSD
0702 East Temasek Junior College 淡马锡初级学院 TJC 1977 22 Bedok South Road Government IP, HP, LEP (CL), MEP
0706 East Victoria Junior College 维多利亚初级学院 VJC 1984 20 Marine Vista Government IP, HP, TSD, NAV
0708 North Yishun Junior College 义顺初级学院 YJC 1986 3 Yishun Ring Road Government

Centralised Institutes (CI)

The only centralised institute is Millennia Institute (MI), which offers a three-year course leading to the GCE A-level examination in arts, science, and commerce.[3]

学好数理化,走遍天下都不怕。

Study mathematics, physics, and chemistry well. Then no matter where you go, you will fear nothing!

Ancient Chinese Proverb

Source: http://www.liuxue86.com/a/1133118.html

美国留学打工 “学好数理化,走遍天下都不怕。”在美国一样适用

美国人口普查局的最新报告显示:同样是学士学位,按工作40年计算,工程专业的毕业生比教育学的毕业生多赚160万美元。真可谓是“男怕入错行,女怕嫁错郎。”

根据美国人口普查局最新发布的2011年社区调查报告,美国具有学士学位的大学毕业证全职工作的人每年中位薪资收入是64396美元,这些人既包括新毕业的大学生,也包括那也干的一辈子最高学位是学士的全职工作者。其中工程专业的薪资最高,平均每年高达91611美元,电脑与数学专业排第二位,年均80180美元,物理、化学、医学等自然科学专业薪水也不错,以80037美元排第三位。在另一个极端视觉和表演艺术专业薪水最低,平均一年只有50484美元,教育专业只有50902美元,心理学专业为55509美元,列倒数前三名,由此可以推算出来从事工程专业工作的人平均每年比从事表演艺术专业的人多挣4万美元,以一个人工作40年计算整个职业生涯收入平均相差160万美元,差距还是很惊人的。