Indian Scientist: Albert Einstein was wrong and that gravitational waves should be renamed “Narendra Modi Waves”

Source: BBC

According to BBC World News,

Some academics at the annual Indian Science Congress dismissed the findings of Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein.

Hindu mythology and religion-based theories have increasingly become part of the Indian Science Congress agenda.

But experts said remarks at this year’s summit were especially ludicrous.

The 106th Indian Science Congress, which was inaugurated by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, runs from 3-7 January.

The head of a southern Indian university cited an old Hindu text as proof that stem cell research was discovered in India thousands of years ago.

G Nageshwar Rao, vice chancellor of Andhra University, also said a demon king from the Hindu religious epic, Ramayana, had 24 types of aircraft and a network of landing strips in modern day Sri Lanka.

Another scientist from a university in the southern state of Tamil Nadu told conference attendees that Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein were both wrong and that gravitational waves should be renamed “Narendra Modi Waves”.

Read more at: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-46778879

America’s Lost Einsteins

Source: https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2017/12/innovation-income-chetty/547202/

Millions of children from poor families who excel in math and science rarely live up to their potential—and that hurts everyone.

Consider two American children, one rich and one poor, both brilliant. The rich one is much more likely to become an inventor, creating products that help improve America’s quality of life. The poor child probably will not.

That’s the conclusion of a new study by the Equality of Opportunity project, a team of researchers led by the Stanford economist Raj Chetty. Chetty and his team look at who becomes inventors in the United States, a career path that can contribute to vast improvements in Americans’ standard of living. They find that children from families in the the top 1 percent of income distribution are 10 times as likely to have filed for a patent as those from below-median-income families, and that white children are three times as likely to have filed a patent as black children. This means, they say, that there could be millions of “lost Einsteins”—individuals who might have become inventors and changed the course of American life, had they grown up in different neighborhoods. “There are very large gaps in innovation by income, race, and gender,” Chetty told me. “These gaps don’t seem to be about differences in ability to innovate—they seem directly related to environment.”

What happens if light slows down

This is an essay I wrote many years ago on an introduction to Special Relativity.

I repackaged it into a book and it is now available on Lulu.com:

Einstein, Relativity and Light for Kids

Lulu Paperback link

There is also an Ebook version:

Einstein, Relativity and Light for Kids

Lulu Ebook link

Excerpt:

What happens if light slows down – A Beginner’s Guide to Relativity and Light

In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. Light is one of the most ubiquitous things that we see, and it is also one of the oldest – it existed since the beginning of mankind. However, light is also mysterious in that no one really understands what it is and how it is rectilinearly propagated. Nevertheless, the speed of light plays an important part in physics, and it is one of the more often quoted constant. What will happen then, if the speed of light suddenly changes from 300000000m/s to a fraction of its original self –3000 m/s? (It is theoretically possible to slow down light to such a speed, by shining a beam of light through a medium with a refractive index of 100,000.)

Einstein: His Life and Universe

Featured Mathematician of the Day: Shing-Tung Yau

Maths Group Tuition starting in 2014!

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shing-Tung_Yau

Shing-Tung Yau (Chinese: 丘成桐; pinyin: Qiū Chéngtóng; Cantonese Yale: Yāu Sìngtùng; born April 4, 1949) is a Chinese-born American mathematician. He won the Fields Medal in 1982.

Yau’s work is mainly in differential geometry, especially in geometric analysis. His contributions have had an influence on both physics and mathematics and he has been active at the interface between geometry and theoretical physics. His proof of the positive energy theorem in general relativity demonstrated—sixty years after its discovery—that Einstein‘s theory is consistent and stable. His proof of the Calabi conjecture allowed physicists—using Calabi–Yau compactification—to show that string theory is a viable candidate for a unified theory of nature. Calabi–Yau manifolds are among the ‘standard toolkit’ for string theorists today.

Yau was born in Shantou, Guangdong Province, China with an ancestry in Jiaoling (also in Guangdong) in a family of eight children. When he was only a few months old, his family emigrated to Hong Kong, where they lived first in Yuen Long and then 5 years later in Shatin. When Yau was fourteen, his father Chiou Chenying, a philosophy professor, died.

After graduating from Pui Ching Middle School, he studied mathematics at the Chinese University of Hong Kong from 1966 to 1969. Yau went to the University of California, Berkeley in the fall of 1969. At the age of 22, Yau was awarded the Ph.D. degree under the supervision of Shiing-Shen Chern at Berkeley in two years. He spent a year as a member of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey, and two years at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Then he went to Stanford University.

Since 1987, he has been at Harvard University,[1] where he has had numerous Ph.D. students. He is also involved in the activities of research institutes in Hong Kong and China. He takes an interest in the state of K-12 mathematics education in China, and his criticisms of the Chinese education system, corruption in the academic world in China, and the quality of mathematical research and education, have been widely publicized.

Shing-Tung Yau at Harvard Law School dining hall
Shing-Tung Yau at Harvard Law School dining hall (Photo credit: Wikipedia)