Intellectual wealth

An interesting news to share:

Source:http://www.thestandard.com.hk/news_detail.asp?we_cat=21&art_id=152297&sid=43527569&con_type=1&d_str=20141212&fc=8

Billionaire Ronnie Chan rather be mathematician or scientist if he could live life over

Billionaire Ronnie Chan Chi-chung seems to have it all figured out. Were the Hang Lung Properties chairman to live his life over again, it would not be as a businessman — he’d be a mathematician or scientist instead.

Chan, who offered this little gem during a speech at the Hang Lung Mathematics Awards ceremony, said he may have more material wealth than famed mathematician Yau Shing-tung but much less intellectual wealth.

As co-founder of the awards, which were set to encourage secondary school students to pursue maths and sciences, Chan urged youngsters to go the extra mile and become mathematicians or scientists as they can contribute more to society than what a businessman can.

Read more at: http://www.thestandard.com.hk/news_detail.asp?we_cat=21&art_id=152297&sid=43527569&con_type=1&d_str=20141212&fc=8

Hopefully this can encourage students currently studying Maths, be it O Level Maths, JC H1 or H2 Maths, or even University Maths!


Featured Book:

The Shape of Inner Space: String Theory and the Geometry of the Universe’s Hidden Dimensions

New Scientist
“It is a testimony to [Yau’s] careful prose (and no doubt to the skills of co-author Steve Nadis) that this book so compellingly captures the essence of what pushes string theorists forward in the face of formidable obstacles. It gives us a rare glimpse into a world as alien as the moons of Jupiter, and just as fascinating…. Yau and Nadis have produced a strangely mesmerizing account of geometry’s role in the universe.”

Nature
“Physicists investigate one cosmos, but mathematicians can explore all possible worlds. So marvels Fields medalist Shing-Tung Yau…. Relating how he solved a major theoretical problem in string theory in the 1970s, Yau explains how the geometries of the vibrating multidimensional strings that may characterize the Universe have implications across physics.”

Mathematicians prove the Umbral Moonshine Conjecture

Source: Science Daily

Mathematicians prove the Umbral Moonshine Conjecture

Date: December 15, 2014

Source: Emory University

Summary: Monstrous moonshine, a quirky pattern of the monster group in theoretical math, has a shadow — umbral moonshine. Mathematicians have now proved this insight, known as the Umbral Moonshine Conjecture, offering a formula with potential applications for everything from number theory to geometry to quantum physics.

“We’ve transformed the statement of the conjecture into something you could test, a finite calculation, and the conjecture proved to be true,” says Ken Ono, a mathematician at Emory University. “Umbral moonshine has created a lot of excitement in the world of math and physics.”

Co-authors of the proof include mathematicians John Duncan from Case Western University and Michael Griffin, an Emory graduate student.

“Sometimes a result is so stunningly beautiful that your mind does get blown a little,” Duncan says. Duncan co-wrote the statement for the Umbral Moonshine Conjecture with Miranda Cheng, a mathematician and physicist at the University of Amsterdam, and Jeff Harvey, a physicist at the University of Chicago.

Ono will present their work on January 11, 2015 at the Joint Mathematics Meetings in San Antonio, the largest mathematics meeting in the world. Ono is delivering one of the highlighted invited addresses.

Read more at: Science Daily


Featured Book:

Moonshine beyond the Monster: The Bridge Connecting Algebra, Modular Forms and Physics (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics)

Review

“An excellent introduction to this area for anyone who is looking for an informal survey… written in a lively and readable style.”
R.E. Boucherds, University of California at Berkeley for the Bulletin of the AMS

“It is written in a breezy, informal style which eschews the familiar Lemma-Theorem-Remark style in favor of a more relaxed and continuous narrative which allows a wide range of material to be included. Gannon has written an attractive and fun introduction to what is an attractive and fun area of research.”
Geoffrey Mason, Mathematical Reviews

“Gannon wants to explain to us “what is really going on.” His book is like a conversation at the blackboard, with ideas being explained in informal terms, proofs being sketched, and unknowns being explored. Given the complexity and breadth of this material, this is exactly the right approach. The result is informal, inviting, and fascinating.”
Fernando Q. Gouvea, MAA Reviews

What do Mathematicians Eat for Breakfast? (Surprising Answers!)

Are you curious what do Mathematicians eat for breakfast? 🙂


Featured Book:

The Math of Food (Integrating Math in the Real World Series)

How can math help you improve your diet?

Sharpens math skills from whole-number operations through basic algebra and geometry
Builds problem-solving and critical-thinking skills
Includes teacher notes, concepts and skills covered, relevant Internet sites, and more

The Mystery of e^Pi-Pi (Very Mysterious Number)

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematical_coincidence

If you have a calculator, check out the value of e^\pi-\pi. It is 19.99909998…

Why is it so close to the integer 20? Is it a coincidence (few things in Math are coincidence), or is it a sign of something deeper? e and Pi are two very fundamental numbers in Math, and the very fact that e^\pi-\pi\approx 20 may well mean something.

This was observed by a few mathematicians (Conway, Sloane, Plouffe, 1988) many years ago, but till this day there is no answer.

Do give it a thought!


Featured book:

Pi: A Biography of the World’s Most Mysterious Number

We all learned that the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter is called pi and that the value of this algebraic symbol is roughly 3.14. What we weren’t told, though, is that behind this seemingly mundane fact is a world of mystery, which has fascinated mathematicians from ancient times to the present. Simply put, pi is weird. Mathematicians call it a “transcendental number” because its value cannot be calculated by any combination of addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and square root extraction.

In this delightful layperson’s introduction to one of math’s most interesting phenomena, Drs. Posamentier and Lehmann review pi’s history from prebiblical times to the 21st century, the many amusing and mind-boggling ways of estimating pi over the centuries, quirky examples of obsessing about pi (including an attempt to legislate its exact value), and useful applications of pi in everyday life, including statistics.

This enlightening and stimulating approach to mathematics will entertain lay readers while improving their mathematical literacy.

Mathematics Memes and Cartoons

Source: http://www.siliconrepublic.com/careers/item/37443-career-memes-of-the-week-m/

This week’s career memes are an ode to mathematicians, the numerical wizards who use their knowledge to solve practical problems in disciplines such as business, commerce, technology, engineering and the sciences.

A mathematician’s job involves performing computations and analysing and interpreting data, reporting conclusions from a data analysis and using those findings to support or improve business decisions, and developing mathematical or statistical models to analyse data.

Many mathematicians work for governments or for private scientific and R&D companies.

Career memes of the week: mathematician

Mathematician meme

Mathematician meme

Mathematician meme

Mathematician meme

How many Pentagons and Hexagons are there on a Soccer Ball?

Watch the above video to prove that there has to be 12 Pentagons and 20 Hexagons on a Soccer Ball!

The video also teaches us about the beautiful Euler Formula, \boxed{V-E+F=2}.


Featured Book:

Euler: The Master of Us All (Dolciani Mathematical Expositions, No 22)

An ideal book for enlivening undergraduate mathematics…he (Dunham) has Euler dazzling us with cleverness, page after page. — Choice

Mathematician William Dunham has written a superb book about the life and amazing achievements of one of the greatest mathematicians of all time. Unlike earlier writings about Euler, Professor Dunham gives crystal clear accounts of how Euler ingeniously proved his most significant results, and how later experts have stood on Euler’s broad shoulders. Such a book has long been overdue. It will not need to be done again for a long long time. — Martin Gardner

William Dunham has done it again! In “Euler: the Master of Us All”, he has produced a masterful portrait of one of the most fertile mathematicians of all time. With Dunham’s beautiful clarity and wit, we can follow with amazement Euler’s strokes of genius which laid the groundwork for most of the mathematics we have today. — Ron Graham, Chief Scientist, AT&T

William Dunham has written a superb book about the life and amazing achievements of one of the greatest mathematicians of all time. Unlike earlier writings about Euler, Dunham gives crystal clear accounts of how Euler ingeniously proved his most significant results, and how later experts have stood on Euler’s broad shoulders. Such a book has long been overdue. It will not need to be done again for a long, long time.Martin Gardner

Dunham has done it again! In “Euler: The Master of Us All,” he has produced a masterful portrait of one of the most fertile mathematicians of all time. With Dunham’s beautiful clarity and wit, we can follow with amazement Euler’s strokes of genius which laid the groundwork for most of the mathematics we have today. — Ronald Graham, Chief Scientist, AT&T