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Featured book:

Coding the Matrix: Linear Algebra through Applications to Computer Science

Google’s signature ranking algorithm “PageRank” is heavily based on linear algebra! Read the above book to find out more!

An engaging introduction to vectors and matrices and the algorithms that operate on them, intended for the student who knows how to program. Mathematical concepts and computational problems are motivated by applications in computer science. The reader learns by doing, writing programs to implement the mathematical concepts and using them to carry out tasks and explore the applications. Examples include: error-correcting codes, transformations in graphics, face detection, encryption and secret-sharing, integer factoring, removing perspective from an image, PageRank (Google’s ranking algorithm), and cancer detection from cell features. A companion web site,

codingthematrix.com

provides data and support code. Most of the assignments can be auto-graded online. Over two hundred illustrations, including a selection of relevant xkcd comics.

Chapters: The Function, The Field, The Vector, The Vector Space, The Matrix, The Basis,Dimension, Gaussian Elimination, The Inner Product, Special Bases, The Singular Value Decomposition, The Eigenvector, The Linear Program

World Cup fans need math to figure out scenarios

World Cup fans need math to figure out scenarios

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/ap/article-2662058/World-Cup-fans-need-math-figure-scenarios.html#ixzz35Rw7VwhW
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RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) β€” Every four years, the World Cup forces fans to remember their math lessons.

Working out what each team needs from its final match to finish in the top two of a group and advance to the knockout rounds takes some algebra knowledge and powers of prediction.

After Brazil and Mexico played to a scoreless draw on Tuesday, the calculation became clear: Both teams just need to draw in their next matches to advance with five points in Group A. Croatia, which beat Cameroon Wednesday, would get to six points by beating Mexico. So a draw with Cameroon would still get Brazil through with five points. If Mexico beats Croatia, Brazil would advance even if it loses. But if Mexico and Croatia draw, and Brazil loses β€” then it gets complicated with tiebreakers.

Netherlands' Arjen Robben, front, scores the opening goal past Australia's Matthew Spiranovic, right, and Australia's goalkeeper Mat Ryan, back, during the g...

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/ap/article-2662058/World-Cup-fans-need-math-figure-scenarios.html#ixzz35RwFh9c3
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook


Featured book:

The Math of Sports: Integrating Math in the Real World (Integrating Math in the Real World Series)

Shifts must be made in education system to prepare young for future: Heng Swee Keat

Source: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/shifts-must-be-made-in/879902.html

SINGAPORE: Education Minister Heng Swee Keat has said that two important shifts must be made in the education system in order to prepare the young for the future.

In a Facebook post on Friday evening, Mr Heng said firstly, the education system must help the young acquire deep skills and integrate theory with practice through applied learning.

Secondly, the system should make it easier for students to continue learning in their areas of strength and interest, and encourage lifelong learning.

Mr Heng said the education system needs to better link the interest and strengths of students to jobs of the future.

He explained that when students develop a deep interest, when their imagination is captured, they can go on to do wonderful things.

Mathematician gives evidence at the O.J Simpson trial, helped find diamonds and now is determining the cause of cancer.

Who says Mathematics is useless? It can be useful one day in your career, or just for increasing your general knowledge.

Source: http://www.news.com.au/national/mathematician-professor-terry-speed-wins-pms-science-prize/story-fncynjr2-1226749944856

Mathematician Professor Terry Speed wins PM’s science prize

 

Professor Terry Speed, Head of Bioinformatics at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, who has bee

Professor Terry Speed, Head of Bioinformatics at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, who has been awarded the Prime Minister’s Award for Science. Picture: Ray Strange Source: News Limited

The man who last night won the Prime Minister’s Science Prize agrees maths is “not sexy” but it saw him give evidence at the O.J Simpson trial, helped find diamonds and now is determining the cause of cancer.

Mathematician Professor Terry Speed was called as an expert witness for O.J. Simpson in the famous 1995 murder trial where he helped explain to the jury how statistics underpinning DNA worked.

Simpson was acquitted after a trial that lasted more than eight months because his lawyers were able to persuade the jurors that there was reasonable doubt about the DNA evidence.

Forty five years ago Professor Speed testified at the trial of Ronald Ryan, the last man to be hanged in Australia.

He had to explain the geometry of the trajectory of bullets in the case.

In an extensive career the 70 year old statistics whiz has helped determine the size and distribution of Argyle diamonds and looked at kangaroo genomics.

Right now he is working at the cutting edge of medical science helping scientists develop statistical tools to understand the huge volumes of information coming from the human genome.

Work he’s done for a company on a thyroid cancer diagnostic test could help prevent thousands of people from having their thyroids removed unnecessarily.

At present some thyroid tests are inconclusive and tumours are removed even though they turn out to be benign leaving the patient taking hormone replacement therapy for the rest of their lives.

Some of his work is in developing tools that find which genes or gene characteristics may cause cancer if they are switched on or off.

Professor Speed says part of the reason so many people don’t want to study maths and science is they don’t see its potential.

He’s spent his life applying mathematical theories to crime, farming, mining and medical science.

Read more at http://www.news.com.au/national/mathematician-professor-terry-speed-wins-pms-science-prize/story-fncynjr2-1226749944856

Japanese Math Professor Excellent Optical Illusionist

Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wx4yi5m8IfI

Uploaded on MarΒ  8, 2011

Japanese mathematics professor Kokichi Sugihara spends much of his time in a world where up is down and three dimensions are really only two. Professor Sugihara is one of the world’s leading exponents of optical illusion, a mathematical art-form that he says could have application in the real world.
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Three sloped ramps are aligned along three of the four sides of a square. Each ramp appears to be sloped in the same direction but when a marble is placed at one end of the ramp it seems to defy gravity.
It’s called an “anti-gravity slide”. Only when the the entire structure is turned 180 degrees, is the illusion revealed.
Japanese mathematics professor Kokichi Sugihara from the Meiji Institute near Tokyo, has made a career of creating optical illusions. He’s devised and built more than a hundred of them, like this one called “Perches and a Ring”.
[Kokichi Sugihara, Meiji University Professor]: “Among these models, there are those which are reproductions of optical illusions, and others that seem like normal models, but when you add movement to them, they show movement that should be impossible in real life. This is done by using the same trick, and I call them ‘impossible motions’.”
Professor Sugihara’s “impossible motions” have been recognized around the world. He won first prize in an international competition last year with this one, called “Magnet-Like Slopes”.
Sugihara says the success of his illusions is tied to human perception. Because humans have the capacity to perceive two-dimensional objects as being three-dimensional, they can be fooled into believing that something “impossible” is taking place during the course of the illusion.
For Sugiraha the illusions aren’t just for amusement. He says they have real world application. For example, he says misjudgments made by drivers on steeply curved roads could be mitigated by changing their perceptions of the immediate environment.
[Kokichi Sugihara, Meiji University Professor]: “If we can find how drivers misjudge an incline, we would be able to construct roads where these incidents are less likely to happen. In other cases, we could also reorganize the surrounding environment so that drivers could more easily see the difference between an ascending and descending road, and it could lead to reducing traffic jams.”
Sugihara says says his dream is to create playground amusements – even buildings with his models. More immediately though he has plans for an “impossible object exhibition”, a venue to demonstrate that seeing really is believing.