Easy Floating Plant: Salvinia

This plant Salvinia (to be precise Salvinia Molesta or Giant Salvinia) is a super easy floating plant. It has 3 forms: Primary, Secondary, Tertiary Forms. I started with Tertiary Form Salvinia, and now have a lot of Primary Form Salvinia, as well as a few Secondary Form Salvinia.

I find that Salvinia is an easy floating plant because:

1) It only requires medium light

2) It has 3 forms and will evolve to the form that is most suited for your tank. The Tertiary Form is usually for outdoor ponds.

3) It is ok with getting a bit wet. Many other floating plants must be completely dry or else they may rot.

4) It has short roots. Hence, there is no need to trim its roots.

5) Easy to remove if you don’t want it. Most of its leaves are linked together. Hence you can remove all the leaves in a few grabs. This is in contrast to duckweed, which is notorious for being hard to remove.


I find that the Primary Form of Giant Salvinia is quite similar to Salvinia Minima, and the Secondary Form of Giant Salvinia is quite similar to Salvinia Natans! Could they be the same species?

Tropica also sells this version of Salvinia which they call it Salvinia auriculata.


24 Water Spangles (Salvinia Minima), Live Aquarium/Aquatic/Floating/Pond/Beginner Plant by G&Z

Fish at Yale-NUS Eco pond

Some very interesting fish (South American cichlids?) at the Yale-NUS Eco-pond. It is quite an unknown place, located deep inside U-Town. Not many people know of its existence. Do check it out if you pass by NUS.

At around the 1:45 mark in the video, you can see some juvenile cichlids eating algae growing on the rock.

Some photos of the Yale-NUS Ecopond:

The pond is behind this large circular fountain.

 

There is also this rare tree (supposedly the only one in Singapore) right behind the pond, called “Margaritaria indica”. I think only expert botanists can tell what is so special about this tree. To laymen (like me), it looks like any ordinary tree.