Recommended Maths Olympiad Books for Self Learning / Domain Test

Math Olympiad Books are useful for GEP/DSA preparation. It is also useful for the latest type of test called Domain Tests, which is basically a subject test (Math included) for entry into top secondary schools like the Raffles / Hwa Chong family. There are different subject domains (depending on the school), ranging from General domain / Academic domain / CCA domain.

A First Step to Mathematical Olympiad Problems (Mathematical Olympiad Series)

The Art of Problem Solving, Vol. 1: The Basics

The first book is written by Professor Derek Holton. Prof Holton writes a nice column for a Math magazine, which gives out books as prizes to correct solutions.

GEP Math Olympiad Books

If you are searching for GEP Math Olympiad Books to prepare for the GEP Selection Test, you may search for Math Olympiad Books for Elementary School. Note that Math Olympiad Books for IMO (International Mathematics Olympiad) are too difficult even for a gifted 9 year old kid!

A suitable book would be The Original Collection of Math Contest Problems: Elementary and Middle School Math Contest problems. It covers the areas of Algebra, Geometry, Counting and Probability, and Number Sense, over 500 examples and problems with fully explained solutions.

Other Suitable Math Olympiad Books for GEP

These are some books that are very popular and highly rated on Amazon.


Challenging Problems in Algebra (Dover Books on Mathematics)

Challenging Problems in Geometry (Dover Books on Mathematics)
Math Circles for Elementary School Students: Berkeley 2009 and Manhattan 2011 (MSRI Mathematical Circles Library)

My Best Mathematical and Logic Puzzles (Dover Recreational Math)
The Moscow Puzzles: 359 Mathematical Recreations (Dover Recreational Math)

The Stanford Mathematics Problem Book: With Hints and Solutions (Dover Books on Mathematics)

The USSR Olympiad Problem Book: Selected Problems and Theorems of Elementary Mathematics (Dover Books on Mathematics)

Student Advice: Comments on Perseverance

Source: http://www.math.union.edu/~dpvc/courses/advice/perseverance.html

Comments on Perseverance:

One source of confusion for students when they reach college and begin to  do college-level mathematics is this:  in high school, it is usually pretty  apparent what formula or technique needs to be applied, as much of the  material in high school is computational or procedural.  In college,  however, mathematics becomes more conceptual, and it is much harder to  know what to do when you first start a problem.  As a consequence of this,  many students give up on a problem too early.

If you don’t immediately know how to attack a problem, this doesn’t mean you  are stupid,


If you already know how to do it, it’s not  really a problem.

or that you don’t understand what’s going on; that’s just how  real problems work.  After all, if you already know how to do it, it’s not  really a problem, is it?  You should expect to be confused at first.   There’s no way you can know ahead of time how to solve every problem that  you will face in life.  You’re only hope, and therefore your goal as a  student, is to get experience with working through hard problems on your  own.  That way, you will continue to be able to do so once you leave  college.

One of the first steps in this is to realize that not knowing how, and the  frustration that accompanies that, is part of the process.  Then you have  to start to figure out the questions that you can ask to help you to break  down the problem, so that you can figure out how it really works.  What’s  really important in it?  What is the central concept?  What roles do the  definitions play?  How is this related to other things I know?

Continue reading at http://www.math.union.edu/~dpvc/courses/advice/perseverance.html