Free Math Movies

Want to watch movies about Mathematics? There is a nice website with Free Movies involving Math. It is not the full movie, but the portion of the movie that involves math.

The site is: http://www.math.harvard.edu/~knill/mathmovies/

This is a collection of movie clips in which Mathematics appears. The site is now in HTML5 video and should be accessible by all devices. If not, chose the direct video links. To include a clip into a presentation, chose the quicktime version.


Some interesting examples include: A Blackboard in linear algebra lecture at MIT on Parseval’s identity in Fourier theory. (http://www.math.harvard.edu/~knill/mathmovies/swf/goodwillhunting.html)


Another example: Young Spock learns Math. He memorizes the formula (4pi/3) r3 for the volume of the sphere, the square root of 2396324 and the definition of dimensionality log(n)/log(d). (http://www.math.harvard.edu/~knill/mathmovies/swf/startrek_spock.html)


If you are really interested in Math in the Movies, check out this book:

Math Goes to the Movies

Mel Gibson teaching Euclidean geometry, Meg Ryan and Tim Robbins acting out Zeno’s paradox, Michael Jackson proving in three different ways that 7 x 13 = 28. These are just a few of the intriguing mathematical snippets that occur in hundreds of movies. Burkard Polster and Marty Ross pored through the cinematic calculus to create this thorough and entertaining survey of the quirky, fun, and beautiful mathematics to be found on the big screen.

Math Goes to the Movies is based on the authors’ own collection of more than 700 mathematical movies and their many years using movie clips to inject moments of fun into their courses. With more than 200 illustrations, many of them screenshots from the movies themselves, this book provides an inviting way to explore math, featuring such movies as:

Good Will HuntingA Beautiful MindStand and DeliverPiDie HardThe Mirror Has Two Faces

The authors use these iconic movies to introduce and explain important and famous mathematical ideas: higher dimensions, the golden ratio, infinity, and much more. Not all math in movies makes sense, however, and Polster and Ross talk about Hollywood’s most absurd blunders and outrageous mathematical scenes. Interviews with mathematical consultants to movies round out this engaging journey into the realm of cinematic mathematics.

This fascinating behind-the-scenes look at movie math shows how fun and illuminating equations can be.