Can dog eat strawberry?

Charlie the poodle eating strawberry. He likes licking the strawberry but actually only eats a little. Maybe Charlie finds it sour.

Back to the question of “Can dog eat strawberry”? The answer is: Yes! Dog can eat strawberry.

Source 1: AKC (American Kennel Club) Strawberries are a healthy, low-calorie, sweet treat for your dog, full of antioxidants, high in fiber and vitamin C. Here’s a bonus. By giving your dog strawberries, you are also helping him stay healthy in more ways than one. For example, over time, fresh fruit may help slow down the aging process, strengthen the immune system, and help with weight management. Strawberries can also help whiten your pup’s teeth. URL: https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/feed-dog-strawberries/

Source 2: Purina Strawberries are good for dogs. But feed strawberries to your dog like you would any other snack. Keep the portion size small. “Treats you feed your dog should make up no more than 10% of his total calories for the day,” Purina Senior Nutritionist, Jan Dempsey says. Use this as a guide so the strawberries you feed your dog won’t cause him to gain extra pounds. URL: https://www.purina.com/articles/dog/nutrition/can-dogs-eat-strawberries

Warning: Dog absolutely cannot eat GRAPES!

Source: AKC No. Grapes and raisins are known to be highly toxic to dogs, though research has yet to pinpoint exactly which substance in the fruit causes this reaction. Because of that, peeled or seedless grapes should also be avoided. URL: https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/can-dogs-eat-grapes/

Adaptil Collar Reviews

There is this relatively new product called “Adaptil” Calm Collar for dogs. Apparently, it is supposed to contain pheromones mimicking those from a mother dog to calm the puppy. The scientific name for the active ingredient is DAP or Dog Appeasing Pheromone.

Reviews on Amazon are quite mixed, there are as many 5 star reviews as 1 star reviews. I think this shows that dogs are complex creatures, it is unlikely that one product works universally for all dogs. Similarly, for humans, there is no single medicine that can “calm” a person down.

If you have any experience with Adaptil with your pet dog, for example how long it takes to show results, please comment below!

You may check out the Amazon reviews below:



ADAPTIL Calming Collar for Dogs | A Constant Calm Anywhere You Go

Stray Feeding Drive May 2020 (SoSD)

Official URL: https://petguru.com.sg/2020/04/20/stray-feeding-drive-2020/

There are indeed more stray dogs than you imagine in Singapore. With the Trap-Neuter-Release-Manage (TNRM) Programme, we aim to reduce the number of strays out there over time. SOSD works closely with stray feeders in different parts of Singapore, in order to trap the dogs, especially the feral ones. Very often, these dogs have learnt to trust their feeders, and catching them would only be possible with the help and cooperation of the feeders who feed them daily.

Amidst the fight against COVID-19, we hope to extend a helping hand to our thankless stray feeders. 365 days a year, the stray feeders painstakingly prepare the daily meals for the stray doggies that they feed, before making their rounds around industrial areas, construction sites or forested areas to deliver food straight to the doggies’ bellies.

If you’ve been wondering how you can chip in during this difficult period, why not make a contribution to ease the pockets of the feeders?

For $98, you can purchase 1 large bag of dog kibbles, to feed 1 stray dog for 40 days.

Simply place your order below, and make payment via PayPal. Orders will close at 2359hrs on 31 May 2020, Sunday. When the donation drive ends, SOSD will coordinate the collection directly with the stray feeders at our supplier’s warehouse.

Please note that tax deduction is not applicable.

Read more at: https://petguru.com.sg/2020/04/20/stray-feeding-drive-2020/

Toy Poodle Pictures

Toy Poodle Pics and Videos

Just to share some pictures and videos of Charlie the toy poodle. Actually, we are unsure of whether he is a pure toy poodle or not, some people commented that he does not look like one! Charlie is 6 months old now.

Poodle apparently descended from a water dog in Germany. Charlie the poodle loves to play water! Also, poodle is commonly said to be the 2nd most intelligent breed, after Border Collie.

Donate to help Stray Dogs in Singapore

URL: https://give.asia/movement/run_for_exclusively_mongrels

3 Singaporeans – Dr Gan, A Dentist, Dr Herman, A Doctor, and Mr Ariffin, a Law Undergraduate will be taking on the Borneo Ultra Trail Marathon on Feb 18th 2017 to raise 30k for Exclusively Mongrels Ltd; a welfare group set up for Mongrels in Singapore. (https://www.facebook.com/exclusivelymongrels/)

Do support them in their cause, if you can. And share this story so as to spread the word (maintenance and upkeep of the dogs can be a huge cost). Mongrels are actually highly intelligent, and can be more healthy and robust as compared to pedigrees, which may have hereditary diseases. For example, the popular Golden Retriever breed is prone to hip dysplasia.

A story told by Dr Gan summarizes everything — The state and welfare of stray dogs in Singapore, supposedly a first-world country, is actually worse than jungle dogs in Borneo. The Orang Asli, primitive junglers in Sabah, apparently treat dogs better than the average layperson in Singapore:

When Dr Gan, an EM member, was running through the trails of Sabah in Oct 2016, he stumbled upon a stray dog.

Being an avid dog lover and the proud father to three rescued Mongrels, he had to stop in his tracks. He fed the dog and it even ran alongside him for a mile or two. Further along the route, he encountered more stray dogs too.

All of the stray dogs he encountered seemed well-fed and were very approachable. They all displayed no aggression, despite being in the middle of a jungle. To Dr Gan, this was a tell-tale sign that the Orang Asli, who lived in villages in these jungles, took care of the dogs by feeding them. The fact that these Orang Aslis were living in harmony with these strays was indeed very commendable in his eyes.

These thoughts stuck with him throughout the run, and on the journey home too.

He couldn’t help but compare the Orang Asli’s hospitality to how a Singaporean layperson would react upon encountering a stray dog. More often than not, even in the absence of aggressive behaviour, a Singaporean who sees a stray dog would view it as no more than a pest and would either chase it away or even, call the authorities. As it so often is when the latter option is exercised, the authorities would have a hard time rehoming the dog and EM has to step in to ‘bail’ the dog out before the authorities euthanize it.

It is strange, he remarked, how the Orang Asli from the jungle can treat these strays with reverence while many Singaporeans would report a stray to the authorities without the slightest hesitation.

“Would the situation end up the same way if, instead of a stray mongrel, there was a stray pedigree dog?”

Armed with the notion that more needs to be done not just for these dogs but also to empower and educate the general public in Singapore about the plight of these strays and what can be done to help them, he then called on his two running buddies to undertake this journey with him.

It was going to be a journey that united his two passions – running and dogs; a journey back to the jungles where he first encountered the strays; back to where he first witnessed the hospitality of the Orang Asli; back to where where the spark was first ignited. He, and his Team, hope to bash through the jungles of Borneo, all in the hopes of blazing a new trail for Mongrels back home, in Singapore.