O Level Bell Curve

Is there “bell curve” for O Levels / A Levels or not?

The answer is “it depends on how you define bell curve”! Technically, no, bell curve is not used but something very similar called “grade boundaries” is being used to determine who gets A1 or A.

Read the below blog post for more information!

Singapore Maths Tuition

Source: https://www.reddit.com/r/singapore/comments/73cmgi/o_level_bellcurve/

It is well known that the “bell curve” is applied to the O Levels result. The most notorious example is E Maths, where 90+ or high 80s is required for the top grade of A1. The traditional mark of 75 is only enough for B3/B4 in the actual O levels.

Update: According to official sources, “grade boundaries” instead of bell curve is being applied to O Levels / A Levels. Technically, there is a subtle difference between the two since the bell curve refers to the normal distribution in statistics. Hence, technically, “bell curve” is not applied to O levels. However, for laymen, “grade boundaries” and “bell curve” are essentially the same thing, meaning that the percentage of A1s or As is being externally controlled by the examiners in the form of “grade boundaries”. It is definitely not the case that 75 marks is sufficient for A1…

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Author: mathtuition88

http://mathtuition88.com

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