Secondary 4 O Level E Maths and A Maths Group Tuition, Bishan

https://mathtuition88.com/group-tuition/
https://mathtuition88.com/

Maths Tuition @ Bishan starting in 2014.

Secondary 4 O Level E Maths and A Maths.

Patient and Dedicated Maths Tutor (NUS Maths Major 1st Class Honours, Dean’s List, RI Alumni)

Email: mathtuition88@gmail.com

Maths Challenge

Hi, do feel free to try out our Maths Challenge (Secondary 4 / age 16 difficulty):

maths challenge

Source: Anderson E Maths Prelim 2011

If you have solved the problem, please email your solution to mathtuition88@gmail.com .

(Include your name and school if you wish to be listed in the hall of fame below.)

Students who answer correctly (with workings) will be listed in the hall of fame. 🙂

Hall of Fame (Correct Solutions):

1) Ex Moe Sec Sch Maths teacher Mr Paul Siew

2) Queenstown Secondary School, Maths teacher Mr Desmond Tay

3) Tay Yong Qiang (Waiting to enter University)

On the road to make math fun: An army major who quit to become a mathematics teacher

Source: http://www.telegraphindia.com/1120625/jsp/calcutta/story_15629755.jsp#.Uq7JOJVDGDk

On the road to make math fun

MITA MUKHERJEE
Madanlal Baldevraj Ghai during the city leg of his tour. Picture by Sayantan Ghosh

An army major who quit to become a mathematics teacher has embarked on a self-funded tour of the country to promote the subject.

Madanlal Baldevraj Ghai, 70, stayed in a dormitory at Howrah station to keep costs down during the three days he spent in Calcutta recently, meeting officials of the primary and secondary board and the school education department to offer suggestions on how to make the study of mathematics more interesting.

“India has produced brilliant mathematicians not just in the Vedic and medieval ages but also in modern times. Unfortunately, for quite a few years, not many students have been pursuing the subject at the higher level, which has resulted in a decline in the number of top-quality mathematicians,” the former teacher at PMN College in Rajpura, Punjab, told Metro.

“We, the elderly mathematics teachers, need to reach out to students and guardians in every corner of the country to dispel the misconception that mathematics is dry and boring,” added Ghai, who has an MPhil in the subject and is pursuing his PhD at Punjabi University, Patiala.

His 50-day tour was also prompted by the Prime Minister declaring 2012 as the year of mathematics as a tribute to Srinivasa Ramanujan, the autodidact mathematician who died in 1920 at the age of 32.

Read more at: http://www.telegraphindia.com/1120625/jsp/calcutta/story_15629755.jsp#.Uq7JOJVDGDk

Maths tutoring adds up for students: OECD study (Singapore PISA tuition effect)

Source: http://www.smh.com.au/data-point/maths-tutoring-adds-up-for-students-oecd-study-20131206-2ywop.html

Many of the world’s most mathematically gifted teenagers come from countries with the most lucrative tutoring industries.

Figures released this week show tutoring in Asia’s powerhouses is widespread, with participation rates more than double those  in Australia, though the extent to which their success is a result of a punishing study schedule is unclear.

In test results released by the OECD, 15-year-olds from Shanghai  topped the mathematics rankings, performing at a level equivalent to three years ahead of students in Australia.
Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/data-point/maths-tutoring-adds-up-for-students-oecd-study-20131206-2ywop.html#ixzz2nXVdY3h0

Why are China students so good at Math & Sciences?

Source: http://sgforums.com/forums/8/topics/475066

Quote:

I’m sure many secondary school/Junior College students have know some China scholars in your schools scoring results that are seemingly impossible to reach (90+ for H2 Maths etc.) But when asked what’s their secret to scoring so well, they said they just study & memorize the same way any other student would do before exams. 

I heard from my seniors that China scholars usually study till 2 am every night, but I don’t buy into that. I think they’re just exaggerated rumors to explain their excellent grades. Some of my friends say that China’s education gave them really solid foundation, such that they can grasp concepts much faster than the rest.  

Anybody know their secret to doing so well?

Read more at http://sgforums.com/forums/8/topics/475066

It seems like the secret of the China scholars is “practice makes perfect”!

http://ideas.time.com/2013/08/20/dont-just-practice-over-practice/

The Time magazine even recommends Over-Practicing (http://ideas.time.com/2013/08/20/dont-just-practice-over-practice/)

Over-Practicing Makes Perfect

The brain can get by on less energy when you overlearn a task
Read more: Over-Practicing Makes Perfect | TIME.com http://ideas.time.com/2013/08/20/dont-just-practice-over-practice/#ixzz2mQyatOKF

Mr Heng, however, noted that how well a child does in school depends on how motivated he is.

Source: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/parents-urged-to-consider/898332.html

Minister for Education Heng Swee Keat has said parents should consider other factors apart from a school’s previous year cut-off point (COP) when helping their P6 children decide on which secondary school to choose.

          Minister for Education Heng Swee Keat (Photo: MOE)

SINGAPORE: Minister for Education Heng Swee Keat has said parents should consider other factors apart from a school’s previous year cut-off point (COP) when helping their P6 children decide on which secondary school to choose.

Writing on his Facebook page, Mr Heng said it would be good for parents to have an open talk with their children to know what type of secondary school they are interested in.

Mr Heng, however, noted that how well a child does in school depends on how motivated he is.

So he encourages parents to carefully consider the kind of environment that will best motivate their children, and enable them to develop themselves fully in the next four to five years.

Some children, he said, are late developers and the right environment helps them thrive.

Mr Heng urged parents to think of how best they can help their children develop confidence and enjoy the space to discover his talents and passions.

Continue reading at http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/parents-urged-to-consider/898332.html

Time needed for each O Level E Maths / A Maths Question

E Maths / A Maths: Maximum time per question

Paper 1: 2 hours (120 min) — 80 marks

Max. Time taken per mark: 1.5 min per mark

Paper 2: 2 hours 30 minutes (150 min) — 100 marks

Max. Time taken per mark: 1.5 min per mark

In O Levels Maths, speed and accuracy is very important indeed!

Study Tips from MIT

Source: http://web.mit.edu/uaap/learning/study/breaks.html

Tooling and Studying: Effective Breaks

Even as an MIT student, you can’t study all the time. In fact, we learn better by switching gears frequently. Here are some tips for breaking up your study time effectively.

  • Approach the same material in several different ways. This increases learning by using different brain pathways. Read a textbook section, aloud if possible, then review your lecture notes on the same concept. Write a one-sentence summary of a chapter or a set of questions to test your understanding. Then move on to the next textbook section.
  • Study in blocks of time. Generally, studying in one-hour blocks is most effective (50 minutes of study with a ten-minute break). Shorter periods can be fine for studying notes and memorizing materials, but longer periods are needed for problem-solving tasks, psets, and writing papers.
  • Break down large projects (papers, psets, research) into smaller tasks. The Assignment Timeline can help with this. Check off each task on your to-do list as you finish it, then take a well-earned break.
  • Plan regular breaks. When building a schedule for the term, srategically add several regular breaks between classes and in the evenings. Take 20-30 minutes; never work through these scheduled breaks. Our minds need an occasional rest in order to stay alert and productive, and you can look forward to a reward as you study. If your living group has a 10 pm study break, or you have a circle of friends that likes to go out for ice cream together at 7 on Wednesdays, put that on your schedule. These small, brief gatherings will become more welcome as the term intensifies.
  • Get up and move. Research shows that sitting for more than three hours a day can shorten your life by up to two years. At least every hour, stand up, stretch, do some yoga or jumping jacks, or take a walk, and breathe deeply.
  • Schedule meals to relax and unwind with friends; don’t just inhale food while tooling.
  • Turn off your phone while studying and on when you take a break. You may think you are multitasking when you text someone while reading or doing problems, but often the reverse is true. An assignment done while texting or following tweets will likely take two or three times longer and not turn out as well.
  • If you tend to lose track of time while using your phone or computer, schedule fixed times for Facebook and other fun things, and set an alarm to remind you of the end of that period.

Study Tips for Mathematics

Here are some useful study tips for Mathematics. The key to acing Maths is to understand that practice is key for Mathematics!

Sincerely hope these tips help.

Please do not study Maths like studying History, Literature or Geography, the study method for Maths is totally different and opposite from studying Humanities. Reading a Maths textbook without practicing is not very helpful at all.

Once a student understands the basic theory of a certain topic (usually just one or two pages of information), he or she can move on to practicing actual questions immediately. While practicing, the student will then learn more and more knowledge and question-answering strategies for that Maths topic.

Even if you already know how to do a question, it is useful to practice it to improve on speed and accuracy.

The study strategy for Maths and Physics are kind of similar, hence usually you will find that students who are good in Maths will also be good in Physics, and vice versa.

Students from China usually do very well in Maths exams because they understand the strategy for studying Maths (which works very well up till JC level), namely a lot of practice with understanding. The strategy is called “题海战术” in Chinese, which means “immersing oneself in a sea of questions”.

Source for diagram below: Email from JobsCentral BrightMinds

maths mindmap

Chinese Math Students vs English Math Students

Source: http://toshuo.com/2007/chinese-math-students-vs-english-math-students/

This is a recent test used in England:

a diagnostic math test for first year university students in England

Here’s a Chinese math test:

a math question from a Chinese college entrance test

Now we know why students from China are so good at Maths!

Formula to guess Month of Birthday from Singapore NRIC

Latest Update: We have created a JavaScript App to Guess Birthday Month from NRIC

Website: http://mathtuition88.blogspot.sg/2014/12/javascript-app-to-calculate-birthdate.html

Here is a Math Formula trick to have fun with your friends, to guess their Month of Birthday given their NRIC, within two tries.

(only works for Singapore citizens born after 1970)

The formula is: take the 3rd and 4th digit of the NRIC, put them together, divide by 10, and multiply by 3.

For an example, if a person’s NRIC is S8804xxxx, we take 04, divide by 10 to get 0.4

Then, 0.4 multiplied by 3 gives 1.2

Then, guess that the person is either born in January (round down 1.2 to 1) or February (round up 1.2 to 2). There is a high chance that you are right! Usually, round up for the first six months (Jan to Jun), and round down for the last six months (Jul to Dec).

This formula was developed and tested by me. There are some exceptions to the rule, but generally it works fine especially for people born from 1980 to 2000.

Hope you have fun with maths, and impress your friends!

 

Shakuntala Devi’s 84th birthday: Google doodles a calculator for the human computer

Source: http://ibnlive.in.com/news/shakuntala-devis-84th-birthday-google-doodles-a-calculator-for-the-human-computer/432095-11.html

Shakuntala Devi\'s 84th birthday: Google doodles a calculator for the human computer

New Delhi: Google is celebrating the 84th birth anniversary of mathematical genius Shakuntala Devi, nicknamed “human computer” for her ability to make complex mental calculations, with a doodle on its India home page.

The doodle salutes Shakuntala Devi’s amazing calculating abilities with a doodle that resembles a calculator.

Shakuntala Devi found a slot in the Guinness Book of World Record for her outstanding ability and wrote numerous books like ‘Fun with Numbers’, ‘Astrology for You’, ‘Puzzles to Puzzle You’, and ‘Mathablit’. She had the ability to tell the day of the week of any given date in the last century in a jiffy. Coming from a humble family, Shakuntala Devi’s father was a circus performer who did trapeze, tightrope and cannonball shows.

Read more at: http://ibnlive.in.com/news/shakuntala-devis-84th-birthday-google-doodles-a-calculator-for-the-human-computer/432095-11.html

Puzzles to Puzzle You

Mathematician gives evidence at the O.J Simpson trial, helped find diamonds and now is determining the cause of cancer.

Who says Mathematics is useless? It can be useful one day in your career, or just for increasing your general knowledge.

Source: http://www.news.com.au/national/mathematician-professor-terry-speed-wins-pms-science-prize/story-fncynjr2-1226749944856

Mathematician Professor Terry Speed wins PM’s science prize

 

Professor Terry Speed, Head of Bioinformatics at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, who has bee

Professor Terry Speed, Head of Bioinformatics at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, who has been awarded the Prime Minister’s Award for Science. Picture: Ray Strange Source: News Limited

The man who last night won the Prime Minister’s Science Prize agrees maths is “not sexy” but it saw him give evidence at the O.J Simpson trial, helped find diamonds and now is determining the cause of cancer.

Mathematician Professor Terry Speed was called as an expert witness for O.J. Simpson in the famous 1995 murder trial where he helped explain to the jury how statistics underpinning DNA worked.

Simpson was acquitted after a trial that lasted more than eight months because his lawyers were able to persuade the jurors that there was reasonable doubt about the DNA evidence.

Forty five years ago Professor Speed testified at the trial of Ronald Ryan, the last man to be hanged in Australia.

He had to explain the geometry of the trajectory of bullets in the case.

In an extensive career the 70 year old statistics whiz has helped determine the size and distribution of Argyle diamonds and looked at kangaroo genomics.

Right now he is working at the cutting edge of medical science helping scientists develop statistical tools to understand the huge volumes of information coming from the human genome.

Work he’s done for a company on a thyroid cancer diagnostic test could help prevent thousands of people from having their thyroids removed unnecessarily.

At present some thyroid tests are inconclusive and tumours are removed even though they turn out to be benign leaving the patient taking hormone replacement therapy for the rest of their lives.

Some of his work is in developing tools that find which genes or gene characteristics may cause cancer if they are switched on or off.

Professor Speed says part of the reason so many people don’t want to study maths and science is they don’t see its potential.

He’s spent his life applying mathematical theories to crime, farming, mining and medical science.

Read more at http://www.news.com.au/national/mathematician-professor-terry-speed-wins-pms-science-prize/story-fncynjr2-1226749944856

Teachers have profound effect on students, says Heng Swee Keat

Source: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/teachers-have-profound/803528.html

Education Minister Heng Swee Keat said teachers “grow knowledge, instill beliefs, inculcate values, nurture passion, and in so doing, they shape the future” of students.

          File photo: Minister for Education Heng Swee Keat

SINGAPORE: Education Minister Heng Swee Keat said on Thursday “teachers affect all of us more deeply” than one can know.

In a Facebook post ahead of Teachers’ Day on Friday, Mr Heng sent his warmest thoughts and admiration to all teachers who dedicate themselves to bringing out the best in children.

In the tribute to all teachers, Mr Heng said they “grow knowledge, instill beliefs, inculcate values, nurture passion, and in so doing, they shape the future” of their students.

He added that every child who grows up confident and compassionate has been affected by a caring teacher in some way.

Mr Heng said in order to give every child a profound educational experience, every teacher must be a caring educator.

Continue reading at http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/teachers-have-profound/803528.html

O Level Formula List / Formula Sheet for E Maths and A Maths

E Maths Formula List / A Maths Formula Sheet

Attached below are the Formula Lists for E Maths and A Maths (O Level)

Do be familiar with all the formulas for Elementary Maths and Additional Maths inside, so that you know where to find it when needed!
Wishing everyone reading this all the best for their exams. 🙂

E Maths Formula List

A Maths Formula List

Click here to read about: How to prevent careless mistakes in math?


Maths Tuition

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Email: mathtuition88@gmail.com

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