New Year, New You from Amazon

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Shop Amazon – New Year, New You Event

Start Date: Dec 26, 2014
End Date: Jan 20, 2015
Type: Seasonal
Categories: Miscellaneous

Check out this New Year offer from Amazon, which ends Jan 20, 2015!

Buy a gift for yourself!
Shop Amazon – New Year, New You Event

A Mathematician’s Lament: How School Cheats Us Out of Our Most Fascinating and Imaginative Art Form


A Mathematician’s Lament: How School Cheats Us Out of Our Most Fascinating and Imaginative Art Form

A Mathematician’s Lament is a short book on the pedagogics and philosophy of mathematics by Paul Lockhart, originally a research mathematician but for many years a math teacher at a private school. Characterised as a strongly worded opinion piece arguing for an intuitive and heuristic approach to teaching and the importance of mathematics teaching reforms, the book frames learning mathematics as an artistic and imaginative pursuit which is not reflected at all in the way the subject is taught in the American educational system.

The book was developed from a 25-page essay that was written in 2002, originally circulated in typewritten manuscript copies, and subsequently on the Internet.

Differentiation Rules

Today, we will recap the four basic rules of Differentiation:

  • Differentiating Powers of x

\displaystyle\frac{d}{dx}x^n=nx^{n-1}

(Power comes down, and the remaining power reduced by 1)

  • Chain Rule (i.e. times differentiate inside the bracket)
  • Product Rule

\displaystyle\frac{d}{dx}(uv)=u\frac{dv}{dx}+v\frac{du}{dx}

(Keep the first term X differentiate the second, PLUS keep the second term X differentiate the first)

  • Quotient Rule

\displaystyle\frac{d}{dx}(\frac{u}{v})=\frac{v\frac{du}{dx}-u\frac{dv}{dx}}{v^2}

(Keep the bottom term differentiate the top MINUS keep the top differentiate the bottom, whole thing over v^2)

COE Quota: Math Formula

Applications of Math in Real Life: COE Quota

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Certificate_of_Entitlement

The Formula for COE Quota is:

\begin{align} (\text{Total COE Quota})_{qy} = &g.(\text{Motor vehicle population})_{y-1}  \\ &+ (\text{Projected de-registrations})_{y} \\&+ (\text{Unallocated quota})_{qy-1} \end{align}

Quote: In the formula above, the subscript y denotes calendar year and the subscript qy denotes quota year (May to April). Initially, projected deregistrations for (calendar) year y were simply taken to be equal to actual deregistrations in y-1 but from quota year 1999-2000 onwards, a projected number of deregistrations has been used.

Each year, the quota is set to allow for a targeted g percent growth in the total motor vehicle population, plus additional quota licenses to cover the number of motor vehicles that will be deregistered during the (calendar) year, plus any unallocated quota licenses from the previous quota year.

Read more at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Certificate_of_Entitlement

Maths Group Tuition at Bishan: E Maths and A Maths

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Six top independent schools in Singapore, including Hwa Chong Institution, have had their funding cut

Source: http://www.straitstimes.com/breaking-news/singapore/story/funding-cuts-top-independent-schools-spore-20140203

            Six top independent schools in Singapore, including Hwa Chong Institution, have had their funding cut and, along with other mission schools, have been told to moderate fund-raising activities for campus upgrading. — ST FILE PHOTO: ALPHONSUS CHERN
By Sandra Davie Senior Education Correspondent

Six top independent schools in Singapore have had their funding cut and, along with other mission schools, have been told to moderate fund-raising activities for campus upgrading.

In addition, they will have to comply with a new directive urging all schools with air-conditioned classrooms to install fans and use air-conditioning only when necessary.

The six schools rank among the top in the Singapore education scene, comprising the Raffles secondary schools and its junior college, Hwa Chong Institution, Anglo-Chinese School (Independent) and NUS High School of Mathematics and Science.

They all run both the Integrated Programme (IP) and Gifted Education Programme (GEP). The IP provides a seamless secondary and junior college education with students bypassing the O levels. The GEP caters to students in the top 1 to 2 per cent of their cohort.

Continue reading at: http://www.straitstimes.com/breaking-news/singapore/story/funding-cuts-top-independent-schools-spore-20140203

JC Results Release

Source: http://www.moe.gov.sg/media/press/2014/01/posting-results-2014-jae-and-jpsae.php

Posting Results For The 2014 Joint Admissions Exercise (JAE) and Joint Polytechnic Special Admissions Exercise (JPSAE)

1The Ministry of Education (MOE) will release the posting results for the 2014 Joint Admissions Exercise (JAE) and the Joint Polytechnic Special Admissions Exercise (JPSAE) on Wednesday, 5 February 2014, at 8.00 am.Applicants can obtain their posting results via the following channels:

2JAE

  • The JAE-Internet System (JAE-IS) is accessible through the JAE website at http://www.moe.gov.sg/education/admissions/jae; and
  • Short Messaging System (SMS) text messages sent to the mobile phone number provided by the applicant during registration.

3JPSAE

4Applicants posted to a Junior College (JC) or the Millennia Institute (MI) should report to these institutions on Thursday, 6 February 2014, at 7.30 am. Applicants posted to a Polytechnic or Institute of Technical Education (ITE) course will receive further instructions via an enrolment package from the respective institutions by mail.

5Appeals

6Applicants who wish to appeal for a transfer to another JC or the MI should approach the institution of their choice directly.

The Mathematics of Chinese New Year (How to calculate its date)

Source: http://www.math.nus.edu.sg/aslaksen/calendar/chinese.shtml

If you are curious about the Mathematics behind the Chinese Calendar, do check out this website by Professor Helmer Aslaksen.

Excerpt: One rule of thumb is that Chinese New Year should be the new Moon closest to the beginning of spring (立春, lìchūn). This rule is correct most of the time, but it can fail if Lìchūn falls close to halfway between two new Moons. It failed in 1985 and will fail again in 2015. Since Lìchūn falls around February 4, this helps explain why Chinese New Year will always fall between January 21 and February 21. It also helps explain why Chinese New Year is called the spring festival. If you have a Western calendar that indicates the phases of the Moon, this will give you an approximation of the date of Chinese New Year. But notice that the Chinese calendar uses the time of new Moon in China.

As explained above, Chinese New Year will always fall between January 21 and February 21. The tropical (or solar) year is about 365.25 days, while a synodic (or lunar) month is about 29.5 days. Hence a lunar year consisting of 12 months will be about 12 x 29.5 = 354 days. So a lunar year is about 11 days shorter than a solar year.

The second rule of thumb is therefore that most of the time Chinese New Year will fall 11 (or sometimes 10 or 12) days earlier than the previous year, but if that would take us outside of the Chinese New Year range of January 21 to February 21, we must add a leap month, so Chinese New Year jumps 19 (or sometimes 18) days later. If this rule takes you close to January 21, you can end up being one month wrong, otherwise you will be at most one day off.

Read more at: http://www.math.nus.edu.sg/aslaksen/calendar/chinese.shtml#CNY

JC School Posting Results 2014

Source: http://www.moe.gov.sg/media/press/2014/01/posting-results-2014-jae-and-jpsae.php

Posting Results For The 2014 Joint Admissions Exercise (JAE) and Joint Polytechnic Special Admissions Exercise (JPSAE)

1The Ministry of Education (MOE) will release the posting results for the 2014 Joint Admissions Exercise (JAE) and the Joint Polytechnic Special Admissions Exercise (JPSAE) on Wednesday, 5 February 2014, at 8.00 am.Applicants can obtain their posting results via the following channels:

2JAE

  • The JAE-Internet System (JAE-IS) is accessible through the JAE website at http://www.moe.gov.sg/education/admissions/jae; and
  • Short Messaging System (SMS) text messages sent to the mobile phone number provided by the applicant during registration.

3JPSAE

4Applicants posted to a Junior College (JC) or the Millennia Institute (MI) should report to these institutions on Thursday, 6 February 2014, at 7.30 am. Applicants posted to a Polytechnic or Institute of Technical Education (ITE) course will receive further instructions via an enrolment package from the respective institutions by mail.

Read more at: http://www.moe.gov.sg/media/press/2014/01/posting-results-2014-jae-and-jpsae.php

Secrets of Mental Math: The Mathemagician’s Guide to Lightning Calculation and Amazing Math Tricks

Is there a mathematical reason why chocolate chip cookies have 37% (1/e) chocolate in them?

Source: http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/651823/is-there-a-mathematical-reason-why-chocolate-chip-cookies-have-37-1-e-chocola?newsletter=1&nlcode=97485%7cd140
Someone once briefly explained to me why it is that chocolate chip cookies have 37% chocolate in them. To the best of my memory it has to do with the way trying to place dots in a circle in a random and scattered way behave, which turns out to be 1/e or ≈37.
Chocolate Chip Cookie 37% 1/e

Interesting article for chocolate lovers!

Source: http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/651823/is-there-a-mathematical-reason-why-chocolate-chip-cookies-have-37-1-e-chocola?newsletter=1&nlcode=97485%7cd140

Math Fun Facts

Source: http://www.math.hmc.edu/funfacts/

Check out this website by Professor Francis Su!

Math Fun Facts are ideas and puzzles that will change the way you think.

This archive is designed as a resource for enriching your math courses and nurturing your interest and talent in mathematics! Each Math Fun Fact is a math puzzle or short article that contains a cool mathematics idea.  You’ll can learn about the mathematics of things like card shuffling to poker to computer  vision to fractals to music, just to name a few.  This makes great enrichment material for gifted math students or problem-solving groups.

http://www.math.hmc.edu/funfacts/

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